A One World Religion is Already Here

One-World-Religion

Guest Writer  Julian Wash

Today I would like to return to your awareness an aspect of the Human condition that adheres to certain religious beliefs and practices. It has long been understood by the architects of social order that a belief system predicated on fear and consequence was essential for maintaining control and domination over a populace. From their perspective you can see how important a template of compliancy would be. So church was created along with its extrusions of laws and moral antecedents that were mixed into that catchall phrase called religion.

There are many sects and orders that offer an illusion of choice. But common threads weave through all the major belief systems. The most prevalent would be the concept of one God or monotheism. This proved to be a workable construct in the minds of many people as it seemed both reasonable and appealing. All beliefs share a scriptural tradition, piety and commitment to faith. There are leaders and followers, flocks and herders. They all “teach” moral lessons and in the process etch a somewhat sinister line between those who “believe” and those who do not.

In the following paragraphs we’ll take a brief look at this concept called church and religion. And though these institutions tower above us so that we must look up to see them, I can assure you that their lofty posturing is just a decadent attempt to make us feel very small. But there is one attribute these grandiose ideologies have overwhelmingly in common— people take them seriously.

Different and Yet the Same

Once you see the wheels of religiosity, then the illusion reveals itself. Whether someone defines themselves as a Christian or a Jew, a Muslim or Hindu they are all yielding to a subset of rules and must abide and act accordingly to the tenants of their faith. In this sense we can see how large populations can be swayed and compelled by the words of their religious leaders. If one were to run a string to each of the major world religions, they could tie a neat little bow at the top. So from the perspective of the New World Order, there really is only one religion. It’s those pesky, independent thinkers and spiritual people that are the cause of all the problems.

I’m reminded when Baron M.A. Rothschild so famously stated, “Give me control over a nations currency, and I care not who makes its laws.” In the end, it’s money that rules a nation and it’s religion that rules a population. You may call your religion whatever you like so long as it’s fear-based and replete with severe consequences for those who disobey. And make sure you design your religion to be divisive and coercive so that those who practice it will surrender to its authority. Build large temples and churches with a bunch of creepy statues so that it looks all official like. The bigger the stained glass windows, the more money in the coffers. -Any questions?

I don’t mean to insult or disparage people of religious persuasion. I am merely suggesting what a fine control apparatus you’ve found yourself in. It’s quite brilliant really, and so I applaud the evil intelligence that concocted this scheme. Most of us feel a need to connect with a higher spirit and awareness. This natural desire was hijacked by institutions who service the soul at very reasonable prices. And for those who are willing to pay the price I say look closely, very closely, at that shiny little ring so gingerly ingrained your nose. This is how you let others lead you. Is it by your will or the will of others that you follow? If it is by the will of God, then what does God say about your church? Does God speak to you as if your belief is right and just and the others have been led astray? Has your religion been complicit in deceit, moral improprieties and derelict indiscretions? If so, then why would God speak through this web of unholiness that patronizes and masquerades as being loving and benevolent? When He speaks does He not speak to you directly? I ask these questions rhetorically because you already know the answers.

Ah, but you say, you are of your own mind. Yes, there are those who walk their own path. They tend to be spiritual. They enjoy the philosophies of religion but are immune to its control. They do not have a shiny ring in their nose, but speak of a shining light they call truth. They know of this light not because someone spoke of it, but because they had sought it out on their own. And so with much bravery and conviction they walked alone until the Light had spoken to them. From there, the road changed. The ivory tower church would become little more than a spectacle of excess funded by people of need. And the temples that abound would become the “temples” on each side of the head. Yep, enlightenment is grand. But it’s a real bitch for the NWO.

Dudley Dualism

One of the key components of churchology is a concept called dualism. We have engaged these concepts of right and wrong, good and evil, dead and alive our entire life. These polarizing precepts are so entrenched in our thinking that it is near impossible to see beyond them. People will say that it’s a lesson taught by nature. We see day and night and hot and cold. Surely duality is a fact of life. Only a fool would deny it.

Well, I’ve been called worse I suppose and the Beatles once wrote of a fool on a hill. If I recall correctly the lyrics weren’t half bad. For what I see is something a bit different indeed. To an observant eye, there does not exist just day and night, but a twilight and dawn too. Nature has shown me not the duality of polarizing opposites, but rather circles of continuation. In this third density playground we often think in very polarizing ways. But in your spiritual space feel free to let go of the polarizing twins.

Duality is religion’s greatest tool. No duality, no religion. Day and night are not extreme opposites but an endless circle. Nature does not consider day and night as opposite so why should you? They are simply transitions in a flowing continuum. The Sun will rise in the light of dawn and set for the twilight hour. The night ushers in a canopy of stars and the moon will speak to those who will listen. And the cosmic wheel will turn upon the Polaris hub and the celestial sky will beckon and yield to yet another day. It is not opposite or polar— it is a circle of continuation, just as we are in a circle of continuation.

Yes, even good and evil have shades between. There’s a balance between the two and it’s forms a circle rather than a line. We can think of the Yin Yang as a model of this, as it even alludes to the transitional nodes that fall between dark and light. The only time something is polarizing is when it’s absolute. If one subscribes to the notion of absolute evil, then one must also maintain that light has never ventured into that desolate void. Hmmm— that sort of takes me to my next thought.

New World Order

The incremental goal of the entity sometimes referred to as “Illuminati” or “global elite” is to initiate a new world order comprised of borderless nations, a single currency and a unifying religion. This idea may seem benign and altruistic to the uniformed. They may believe this would usher in a forward leap in societal evolution. Nothing could be further from the truth. In their fantastical vision of a new world there would ultimately be just a handful of people hanging out at the five-star restaurant/casino at the top of their thirty-three story golden pyramid. They would control essentially every aspect of our lives under the cover of some quasi-democratic scheme of governance. Moving from one country to another to escape an intolerable regime would cease to be an option. In other words, there would be no place to hide.

Well, things are pretty much starting to shape up this way already. With well-established global entities like the International Monetary Fund, United Nations and the Council on Foreign Relations, we are well on our way toward global governance. And then there’s the issue of borders. Back in January of 1994, the North American Free Trade Agreement between the United States, Canada, and Mexico (NAFTA) entered into force. When interviewed by the Los Angeles Times in July, 1993, Henry Kissinger made the following comment regarding NAFTA. He stated “it will represent the most creative step toward a New World Order taken by any group of countries since the end of the cold war. The revolution sweeping the Western hemisphere points to an international order based on cooperation. It is this revolution that is at stake in the ratification of NAFTA. What congress will have before it is not a conventional trade agreement, but the Architecture of a new international system.” That was Kissinger’s polite way of saying— do this or else!

And now the issue of immigration has boiled over the pot with the U.N. suggesting that the recent influx of undocumented immigrants be labeled “refugees” instead of illegal aliens. So it would seem that we will see borders continue to erode and it’s conceivable that they will dissolve completely at some point. In a perfect world there would be no need for borders. But we are not in a perfect world and the people who are calling the shots are essentially psychopaths that thirst for control and domination.

And the monetary system— well they’re working on that to. The “amero,” the monetary union of Canada, the United States and Mexico will undoubtedly be back on the table in one form or another and will be force-fed to us just as Europe was force-fed the euro. The euro replaced the national currencies of France, Germany, Spain, Italy, Greece, Portugal, Luxembourg, Austria, Finland, the Republic of Ireland, Belgium, and the Netherlands back in 2002.

But the one world religion— well, they already have that in the bag. In my humble opinion, subscribing to any faith-based organization is paramount to being one with the state. Such souls are already under the spell of an external, synthetic influence. The breakdown goes something like this: approximately (17) percent of the world population is Catholic, Protestants represent 5 percent, other Christians, Anglicans and Orthodox weight in at 15.7 percent combined, 21 percent are Muslim and 13.3 percent call themselves Hindu. Other religions including Buddhist, spiritual and the non-religious comprise roughly 28 percent of the global population. So in conclusion, approximately 72 percent of the world abides by a fairly rigid religious pedigree.

Final Thought

Yes, as separate as they may seem, all major world religions have their legions of followers and charismatic leaders. The ideologies are rooted in dualistic models of good and evil, heaven and hell. They are scripted with stories of triumph and defeat and with metaphors that open gateways for a multitude of interpretation. They are anchored into what we inherently know to be true and manipulate meaning to serve a specific purpose.

It was not my intention to cause strife or hurt feelings. I love all people regardless of race, gender, political ideology and yep, religion. But I know what organized religion has done to societies in the past and I know what they are capable of doing today. The seventeen versions of the Bible were written by councils of men, and each was tailored for a certain purpose. And though there is much wisdom to be gleaned in these texts, they offer no substitute for that Divine connection we are all capable of with Source.

I am not religious. I am spiritual. My experience is unique to me and that’s the extent of it. I have found my truth without a permission slip and I have walked alone in the cold looking for the light. I would not be told how I should think or how I should feel. There were times I felt a need to hold a hand on this lonely path of self-discovery. One day a hand reached down to me and I knew I was not alone. I know you’re not alone either.

I see the Sun is setting now, and His light rays are “walking” on water. They say we should not stare at the Sun, but I care not what they say. I am, after all, the fool on the hill.

-Until next time

About the Author

There is a certain obscurity that follows Julian Wash. After all, any writer that starts off with “Dear Humans” might be a little hard to nail down. We sense he’s benevolent, a little crazy and we think rather enjoyable to read. Email: jwash@rattlereport.com

**This article was originally published at The Rattle Report.**

This article is offered under Creative Commons license. It’s okay to republish it anywhere as long as attribution bio is included and all links remain intact.

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Saṃsāra and Nirvana – the Ultimate Duality

Samsara

I loved this article and happily I just received permission from Ethan Indigo Smith to republish it here . (He mentioned to add that he is giving away books, visit his amazon author page for more info at the link at bottom. I dedicate this to my beautiful granddaughter who’s name is Samara. :)

By Ethan Indigo Smith

Contributing Writer for Wake Up World

The more I learn about Buddhism, the more I appreciate the many teachings of Buddha and the subsequent learned people who followed him, and the more I hear people speaking on such lessons – whether they realize it or not.

Truth resonates like that. To find resonating truth in the time of the Kali Yuga – the Fourth Age of Deception – I try to find correlation of information among many subjects, and Buddhism both reveals truth and also correlates with truths from other cultures and also others systems; those of science, psychology and the esoteric.

I will attempt to summarize one of the most profound teachings of Buddhism that can require an immense amount of absorption (another term for meditation or contemplation) to integrate – that there is Saṃsāra and Nirvana. Understanding this duality can lead to a greater understanding, being the ultimate contrast of Buddhism.

First though, here are some teachings as a base to this idea.

Saṃsāra and Nirvana

Saṃsāra literally means “continuous movement” and is commonly translated as “cyclic existence” or “cycle of existence”. In Buddhism, Saṃsāra refers to the continual repetitive cycle of birth and death that is created by our fixating on the self and experiences, specifically, the process of cycling through rebirth after rebirth within the six realms of existence. In the Buddhist view, one can only be liberated from Saṃsāra through Nirvana.

Nirvana literally means “extinguishing”, and refers to the extinction of the fires of attachment, aversion and ignorance. In the Buddhist view, when these fires are extinguished, suffering comes to an end and one is released from the cycle of rebirth.

Buddhists perceive reality and its volatile predictability through a set of conditions or principles, known as the Four Thoughts. One, we have a precious human body capable of gaining enlightenment and assisting others in the process. Two, everything is impermanent; ourselves and the condition of the natural and man-made world, if you will. Three, everything is made up of Karma; you are the result of it and everything that’s been done results in karma bouncing around. Four, we exist in the state of Saṃsāra, this gross physical realm where we can be either animals chasing tails or carrots tied to string – or we can become elevated beings.

An optimal response to these conditions is contained in The Four Immeasurables. These are Love for self, Love for others, Love for the happiness of others, and Love for all in equanimity. The conditions of Saṃsāra require that we take compassionate courses of action via the Four Immeasurables – the four forms of love – otherwise we enhance our suffering and the suffering of others. Buddhists, having addressed reality thoroughly, realize that in every meeting there is parting, in every spring there is fall, and in every birth there is death.

Saṃsāra is the happiness and hell on earth, the everything. Its opposite is Nirvana. Samsara is everything in reality. Nirvana is nothingness; the bliss that just IS, the essence beyond birth and death and even beyond duality. It is oneness.

Here in Saṃsāra, practically everything is polarized and more specifically in a dualistic state of polarity, a state where there is spring, there is fall and for every winter there is summer. Saṃsāra is a war world, a place of ego and power, of total contradiction. We fight in the name of peace, poison our bodies with toxic “medicines” and unnatural foods, and view our religious faiths as a point of separation, not of Oneness. And so Saṃsāra will remain a war world until the Majority of Love takes control from the oligarchical institutions that rule over us globally. Until then, humanity will continue on the treadmill of birth and death, while it struggles to reconcile the duality of its own existence.

Boys meditating

There are lessons and concepts in this Buddhist teachings that can be applied spiritually and intangibly, in a multitude of ways. But Buddhism can all be seen as an allegory for how we approach our daily life and reality.  We all have the ability to manifest Saṃsāra or Nirvana, here and now. We can act on behalf of lifeless institutions, ignoring the Four Thoughts and Four Immeasurables, or we can proceed in peaceful compassionate unison with each other – and remove the roadblocks of failed institutions along the way.

Each of us, in equanimity, is just a wandering sentient being – and most of us are extremely compassionate at heart. In fact there is mounting evidence that humankind is evolving (from necessity) to become more compassionate. We have the technology and resources to provide for the energy, food and water needs of every human being on the planet, but dismayed, we stand back and watch our institutions direct our resources toward war and corporate empire-building.

Something is not right here.

Why is it that we collectively fashion billions of dollars and thousands of people together for war instead of building equal infrastructure to help one another? Why are we allowing the others to dictate priorities to us which are so unaligned to our true nature?

Because the majority of us are living in a state of warring consciousness; we were born into it; we exude that consciousness and manifest it outwardly via what are now long-standing war machines — those military, nuclear and industrial institutions and legislative devices that are either built to kill, or are slowly killing us anyway. But the Powers That Be forget the important lessons of history… the inquisitors and oppressors never win the battle, and no empire lasts forever. 

Choose peace over war, choose individuals over institutions, choose compassionate helping instead of passionate hindering. Remember The Four Thoughts and Four Immeasurables. When institutions try to build another war machine or oligarchical institution, or try to illicit another senseless war, remember: if it’s not done out of love it’s not worth doing. The only way out of Saṃsāra is through Nirvana.

For more information, please check out my previous article Meditation and Intuition in the Fourth Age of Deception (the Kali Yuga)

Previous articles by Ethan (excellent reading!):

About the author:

Ethan Indigo SmithAuthor, activist and Tai Chi teacher Ethan Indigo Smith was born on a farm in Maine and lived in Manhattan for a number of years before migrating west to Mendocino, California. Guided by a keen sense of integrity and humanity, Ethan’s work is both deeply connected and extremely insightful, blending philosophy, politics, activism, spirituality, meditation and a unique sense of humour.

The events of September 11, 2001 inspired him to write his first book, The Complete Patriot’s Guide to Oligarchical Collectivism, an insightful exploration of history, philosophy and contemporary politics. His more recent publications include:

  • Tibetan Fusion a book of simple meditative practices and movements that can help you access and balance your energy
  • The Little Green Book of Revolution an inspirational book based on ideas of peaceful revolution, historical activism and caring for the Earth like Native Americans
  • The Matrix of Four, The Philosophy of the Duality of Polarity on the subject of the development of individual consciousness
  • 108 Steps to Be in The Zone a set of 108 meditative practices and steps toward self discovery and individual betterment, including techniques to develop balance, transmute sexual energy and better the self
  • and the controversial book, Terra-ist Letters, a work that humorously contrasts the very serious issues of global nuclear experimentation promotion and global marijuana prohibition

For more information, visit Ethan on Facebook and check out Ethan’s author page on Amazon.com

The Meaning of Peace in the Bhagavad Gita

Krishna
The superb Sanskrit text, The Bhagavad Gita, is an amazing guide and in my view the ultimate “user’s manual” for the human adventure. This ancient text is a dialogue between two mighty heroes: Krishna and Arjuna. Krishna represents the God within us all who is always waiting patiently to guide us – if we can listen. Arjuna is the greatest warrior of the time and Krishna is his charioteer in the battle of life. He will steer Arjuna through, if Arjuna hears and understands.

 

The entire dialogue takes place the middle of a battlefield where Krishna and his best friend Arjuna are getting ready to fight a monumental battle between the two opposing sides of the same family. Arjuna has lost his courage and cannot accept the thought that he must kill members of his own family and friends in this terrible bloody war. He has thrown down his weapons and is sitting depressed and dejected in the bottom of his chariot.

 

The Sanskrit word Shanti means peace, but what is Krishna saying in the Bhagavad Gita when he uses this word Shanti? Are there not many wars going on within us all, wars raging in our own hearts and minds? These inner wars cloud our thoughts, consume our energies and make us stupid.

Krishna tells his good friend Arjuna that no man can know happiness without peace (II.66). In fact the sequence of our compulsions is quite predictable. We start thinking about a particular thing and from those thoughts, we want it. If our desire for the thing is frustrated, we become angry. Once we are angry, our ability to reason and think clearly is skewed.

From this anger rises delusion. We tell ourselves all kinds of absurd things. We deserve that thing and we will do anything to get it, no matter what the consequences, no matter what our actions might do to our soul. We forget that perhaps the thing is not ours to have, or that we don’t deserve it; or that it may not be the right time for us to have such a thing, it might bring us harm.

Thus from anger arises delusion, and from delusion loss of memory – what we call denial – and from loss of memory we begin to lose conscious awareness of and contact with our own spirit. Krishna calls this the ‘death of the spirit’ which leads to real death.

Uncontrolled desire leads to death. Krishna points out the wiser way. Instead of allowing our desires to devour our peace of mind, the man of wisdom develops an evenness, a subtle intelligent detachment and disinterest in the objects of the senses. These objects are thrown at us 24/7 on our television screens. We are told we can only be happy when we have this car, or that cell phone and the latest techno-gadgets. We must be thin and young, we must endlessly consume products that will make us happy winners.

By the time we are in our 30’s most of us know that none of these things have made us happy. In fact we tire of them very quickly and must have more, more, more. Ah, the next thing we desire will finally bring us that elusive happiness we have been chasing. But it never happens.

Lasting happiness is not to be found in the external world. Temporal experiences of joy and suffering are in abundance, but real lasting peace and understanding are only found within. When Time makes us wise and weary of being fools, we turn within and begin to question everything.

We begin to understand how our unruly desires have run us, controlled us, made us act compulsively, and left us even emptier than before. We begin to observe this process. We see how our five senses have drawn us into this delusion and we consider the idea of practicing an enlightened control.

The continued practice of observing the reactions of the senses and controlling our own thoughts in the mind will inevitably lead us to inner peace. This is ‘the peace that surpasses all understanding’ (Philippians 4:7) and this Peace is our Home, the Source of our Real Self and the entire universe.

This is the Shanti that Krishna speaks of in the Bhagavad Gita. For as Krishna says, the mind that allows the senses to carry off his or her capacity for insight – literally looking within – is as helpless as a ship caught in a storm at sea.

Krishna teaches Arjuna how to act wisely and gives him the knowledge he needs to understand his place in the universe. Krishna tells Arjuna that whoever has purified his mind in the fires of Knowledge and mastered his senses will obtain this Peace (IV.39).

***

The five senses make their contact with the external world and its objects, and send their information-impulses to our brain, allowing us to experience the polarities of pleasure and pain, sukha-duhkha in Sanskrit. These experiences are impermanent and are to be endured, for what is temporal has no ‘real’ existence and is unreal (Asat) in the sense that it is fluctuation and change (Bhagavad Gita II.14-16). While the real (Sat) always exists, as the 14th century Sufi poet Mahmud Shabistari says, ‘beneath the curtain of each atom.’

It is not that the external world has no value as some believe. However, its state of constant change makes it the unreal (Asat) in the sense that it is impermanent. The external reality is very real to the five senses, but there is so much more to our world than what we can see, hear, touch, etc. Everywhere there is the imperishable (akshara) that permeates, supports and sustains the temporal illusory hologram.

Without Knowledge of this eternal, immutable, imperishable Real – we are lost, floating on a sea of delusion and ignorance that tosses us around at whim and fools us into thinking that possessions and pleasure can give us meaning.

Krishna teaches his friend that this universe is pervaded by that which is indestructible and Arjuna has no power to kill that. The body may die, but the soul (Atma) never dies. It simply transmigrates to a new body, just as we get new clothes when our old ones are worn out. (II.17-22)

When our body is worn out we move into new forms that resonate with our thoughts, new data-collecting vehicles to expand our expression of the God within us all. The realization that you never die changes your entire attitude towards living and you have the opportunity to become less attached to the perils, failures, and successes of your current identity self.

There comes a time when in wisdom you will not care if you have been immortalized by the media. Your search for meaning will not be based on the approval or disapproval of others. You will care more about doing what is right, taking action with the greatest integrity and knowledge you have available to you in that moment, and that knowledge will always be changing as you continually reevaluate its worth.

You will ask yourself, not so much, what did I accomplish – but rather what consciousness was I in when I acted. When that time comes you will have Wisdom, you will have imperishable Peace.

V.Susan Ferguson

“If you become slave of Prakriti (The Matrix), you are gone. When you follow these, follow the movements of these five sense organs, i.e., five senses of cognition and five senses of action, along with the touch of these three gunas, you are just sheep, you are just carried by Prakriti. And this is that individual being who is governed by Prakriti.

“He creates this, he creates this universe. Because everybody has his own universe in his mind; you have your own world, you have your own world, you have your own world. And that world you have created by combination of these…by following your nature.

“When you command Prakriti, then you don’t create your world. Once you have not created your world, you are free, you have no rebirth. You won’t come…you won’t be entangled in repeated births and deaths.” ~ Bhagavad Gita

About the Author

V. Susan Ferguson is the author of Inanna Returns, Inanna Hyper-Luminal; her own commentary on the Bhagavad Gita and the Shiva Sutras; and Colony Earth & the Rig Veda. Her website is Metaphysical Musing.

 

This article is offered under Creative Commons license. It’s okay to republish it anywhere as long as attribution bio is included and all links remain intact.

Rescuing the Bible from Literalism

As you can probably tell, saving Christianity and Christ Consciousness from religion is very important to me. Sometimes it feels like it was my mission before being born. Maybe I was burned as a heretic in a past life…

04

By RICHARD SMOLEY

“The world,” wrote the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein, “is the totality of facts, not of things.” So it is, but facts take many forms. The hard-edged events of ordinary reality are only one form, and not always the most important.

This insight can be hard to accept in the positivist world of mainstream Western thought. In these terms, either an event took place or it did not. Truth and falsehood are judged by this criterion alone. And yet such a stance has only a limited value. It is indispensable in history and journalism and perhaps in science (although the anomalous discoveries of twentieth-century physics have blurred the picture somewhat). But in the spiritual dimension, even though there are facts here as well, they are not of this kind. To overlook this truth is to mistake one reality for another.

Conventional Christianity has often made this mistake. Practically from the start, it has presented its case in literalistic terms: the Bible is true; moreover it is literally true. Its facts must be historical facts, and its record of the past must be a true one. At first these claims fostered Christianity’s rapid success in the ancient world. By the early centuries of the Common Era, Greco-Roman civilisation could no longer take its own myths seriously, so it was persuaded to adopt the Scriptures of the Jews and Christians on the grounds that these presented not only sacred truths but an accurate record of the past.

Since the Enlightenment, such claims have been more of an embarrassment than an advertisement for the faith. Over the last 250 years, scholars in many fields have taken Christianity at its word and investigated in great depth just how much the Bible jibes with science and history. The findings have not exactly vindicated the Good Book. Indeed the trend over time has been to call more and more of the Bible into question as a historical record.

From a scientific point of view, the tide began to turn in the early nineteenth century. In 1830–32, the British scientist Charles Lyell published his classic Principles of Geology, arguing that geological changes that are recorded in rocks could not possibly have taken place in the mere 6,000 years that Genesis assigned to the earth’s lifetime, but had occurred over a much longer period. A generation later, another, even more famous scientist, Charles Darwin, suggested that animal species had not been created by the Almighty on a single day of creation in 4004 BCE, but had evolved over much longer periods by what he called “natural selection.” (In fact, when Darwin had finished his magnum opus, The Origin of Species, he sent it to Lyell for comments.)

Historicity of the Bible Questioned

In recent decades, archaeology has cast doubt even on parts of the Bible that had seemed more or less factual, such as the history of Israel in the Old Testament. To take one example, a generation ago most scholars accepted the historicity of the Exodus from Egypt, believing at least that some migration of this kind happened, even if the narrative had to be stripped of its miraculous festoonings. Since then, the picture has changed considerably. Summarising recent findings in their 2001 book The Bible Unearthed, Israel Finkelstein and Neil Asher Silberman contend that the Exodus did not happen in any form that is recognisable from the archaeological record. The first mention of Israel in any known inscription, they note, dates from the reign of the Egyptian Pharaoh Merneptah in 1207 BCE. While this is around the time traditionally assigned to the Exodus, the inscription speaks not of a flight of Israelites (or even an expulsion), but of Merneptah’s successful incursion into Canaan, where Israel is reckoned among the peoples subdued. In any case, the Israelites could not have escaped to Canaan out of the hands of the Egyptians, because Canaan was part of Egyptian territory at the time; Merneptah’s invasion would have been to quiet a troublesome province.

Instead, Finkelstein and Silberman suggest that the biblical account of the Exodus is a composite of folk memories of the Hyksos – a Semitic people who ruled Egypt from c.1670 to c.1570 BCE before being expelled by the Egyptians. The Exodus story as we know it was framed in the seventh century BCE, when the national ideology of Jerusalem and the nation of Judah was beginning to crystallise – and Egypt was a powerful and aggressive neighbour.

Other scholars have come up with equally revolutionary insights. In her work The Great Angel, the British biblical scholar Margaret Barker points out that originally the Israelites worshipped a female goddess, known as Asherah (or sometimes as Hokhmah or “Wisdom”), as the consort of Yahweh, alongside El, the Most High God, and Yahweh himself, who was essentially a national deity allocated to Israel alone. Barker suggests that the famous Deuteronomic reform under the Judahite King Josiah – in which Josiah purges the Temple of these other gods and restores the worship of Yahweh alone (2 Kings 22-23) – was not a reform but an innovation, a purge of time-honoured traditions in an attempt to create a “Yahweh-alone movement.” This movement eventually took over Judaism after the Babylonian Exile and imposed its own agenda on the past.

One could make similar points about much of the rest of the Bible. The “quest of the historical Jesus,” as Albert Schweitzer so famously dubbed it, has gone on for over two centuries now without any really conclusive results. Most scholars are convinced that there is some admixture of myth and legend in the life of Christ as portrayed in the New Testament, but they differ enormously about just what was legend and what was not. The panel of liberal New Testament scholars known as the Jesus Seminar has won some notoriety for contending that Jesus neither said nor did most of the things attributed to him in the Gospels. As shocking as some may find this claim, it is hardly new: an array of German New Testament scholars reached much the same conclusions in the nineteenth century. A still more radical view holds that Jesus never existed at all: his story was merely a Jewish equivalent of the numerous death-and-resurrection myths circulating in the ancient world. Since there is no archaeological evidence for Christ’s life, and the textual evidence is elusive (none of the Gospels, canonical or apocryphal, even claims to be an eyewitness account), this position, as extreme as it is, is hard to definitively refute.

Biblical Stories as Allegory, Not History

What, then, are we to do with the Bible as history? Some will no doubt cling to it. The literary critic Harold Bloom has noted that in evangelical Christianity, the “limp leather Bible,” waved at the audience by the preacher, has itself become a totem. But others are unlikely to find refuge in a simplistic bibliolatry. They may be drawn to another approach – one that is equally ancient, and possibly more profound. It is that the Bible is not, and never was, meant to be taken literally, but has deeper meanings that are to be unearthed by those are capable of doing so.

This idea goes back to the very beginnings of Christianity and has always existed side by side with narrow literalism. Ironically, it was a major impetus for the creation of Christianity as a separate religion from Judaism. The nascent Christian movement often had to allegorise the Hebrew Scriptures to make use of them for its own purposes. The Apostle Paul writes about one biblical passage:

It is written, that Abraham had two sons, the one by a bondmaid, the other by a freewoman.

But he who was of the bondwoman was born after the flesh; but he of the freewoman was by promise.

Which things are an allegory: for these are the two covenants; the one from the mount Sinai, which gendereth to bondage, which is Agar.

For this Agar is mount Sinai in Arabia, and answereth to Jerusalem which now is, and is in bondage with her children.

But Jerusalem which is above is free, which is the mother of us all (Gal. 4:22–26).

Paul is saying that the real meaning of the story of Abraham and his two sons lies in the relationship of the Jews and the Christians. Ishmael, the older son, born to Hagar (or Agar), “the bondwoman,” is the Jews, who are in “bondage” to the Law of Moses. Isaac, the younger, born to Sarah, the “freewoman,” represents the Christians, who are freed from having to follow the Law. The story is an “allegory.”

The first authority to use the word “allegory” in this sense (the Greek is allegoria) – and the first to expound the Hebrew Bible in this way – was a philosopher who lived at the same time as both Jesus and Paul: Philo of Alexandria (c.20 BCE–c.50 CE). Although there is no reference to Jesus or Paul in his works or to Philo in the New Testament, it would be hard to overstate Philo’s influence on Christianity. To take one example, it was he who first used the Greek word logos (often translated as “word”) to mean the creative, structuring element in consciousness and to contend that this principle had engendered the world. Philo’s view was prevalent in the Judaism of the first century CE, in which the logos was often seen as a kind of deuteros theos or “second god.” The Christians appropriated this theology, especially in the Gospel of John, whose prologue “In the beginning was the Word” etc. is almost a programmatic statement of Philo’s thought. Philo, of course, never equated this logos with Jesus, as the Christians did, and once the Christian view had spread throughout the ancient world, the Jews dropped the concept of the logos entirely.

In any event, Philo viewed the Hebrew Bible through the lens of allegory. Here is Philo on Genesis:

“And on the sixth day God finished his work which he made.” It would be a sign of great simplicity to think that the world was created in six days, or indeed all in time…. But… it would be correctly said that the world was not created in time, but that time had its existence as a consequence of the world….. When, therefore, Moses says, “God completed his works on the sixth day,” we must understand that he is speaking not of a number of days, but that he takes six as a perfect number.

Philo goes on to explain what he means by a perfect number. Obviously this is a far richer and more sophisticated understanding of a sacred text than the simplistic idea that the world was made in six literal days.

The Christian theologian who is most indebted to Philo was the third-century Church Father Origen. Origen went further than Philo, however, in being much more eager to discard the literal truth of passages that seemed contrary to reason. Here is Origen on Genesis:

Who is so silly as to believe that God, after the manner of a farmer, “planted a paradise eastward in Eden,” and set in it a visible and palpable “tree of life,” of such a sort that anyone who tasted its fruit with his bodily teeth would gain life: and again that one could partake of “good and evil” by masticating the fruit taken from the tree of that name? And when God is said to “walk in the paradise in the cool of the day” and Adam to hide himself behind a tree, I do not think anyone will doubt that these are figurative expressions which indicate certain mysteries through a semblance of history and not through actual events.

Origen does not spare the Gospels or the writings of the Apostles, “for,” he writes, “the history even of these is not everywhere pure, events being woven together in the bodily sense without having actually happened; nor do the law and the commandments contained therein entirely declare what is reasonable.”

Such an attitude seems strikingly modern – and yet these are the words of a third-century Church Father. Origen spoke of three levels of meaning to Scripture (body, soul, and spirit, in accordance with the tripartite division of human nature accepted by early Christianity). This view would be tremendously influential. The scholar Beryl Smalley has written that “to write a history of Origenist influence on the West would be tantamount to writing a history of Western [biblical] exegesis.”

By the Middle Ages, Origen’s three levels of meaning for Scripture would be expanded to four. They were called the literal, allegorical, moral, and “anagogical” or mystical senses. Dante, writing in the early fourteenth century, refers to them in his Letter to Can Grande, where he says of the Exodus:

If we look at it from the letter alone it means to us the exit of the Children of Israel from Egypt at the time of Moses; if from allegory, it means for us our redemption done by Christ; if from the moral sense, it means to us the conversion of the soul from the struggle and misery of sin to the status of grace; if from the anagogical, it means the leavetaking of the blessed soul from the slavery of this corruption to the freedom of eternal glory. And though these mystical senses are called by various names, in general all can be called allegorical, because they are different from the literal or the historical.

Origen, who is evasive about actually setting out the hidden meaning of Scripture (“it was the method of the Holy Spirit rather to conceal these truths and to hide them deeply,” he writes), makes reference to Egypt as well. He speaks of “the descent of the holy fathers into Egypt, that is, into this world.” For Origen as for Dante, then, the Exodus ultimately presents an allegory of spiritual liberation.

Origen died around 253 CE, crippled by torture during the persecution of the Christians by the Roman Emperor Decius. Since then, Origen has had an ambiguous destiny in the mainstream church. Revered in his own day, in later centuries he fell into disrepute among the orthodox. This happened for a number of reasons, but it was largely because his views on the relationship between the Father and the Son did not jibe with the doctrine of the Trinity as it would evolve in the fourth and fifth centuries. Furthermore, later theologians did not feel entirely comfortable with Origen’s assertion that much of Scripture was not meant to be taken as literally true. Although the churchmen were generally content to accept his idea that there were other meanings in addition to the literal one, they did not like to think the literal sense was wrong or even (as we’ve seen Origen say about the myth of Eden) ridiculous.

Protestantism and Literalism

If the Catholic and Orthodox churches were always comfortable with a symbolic meaning to the Bible, where did today’s excruciating biblical literalism come from? Partly from Protestantism. Catholicism and Orthodoxy always regarded the Bible as an authority, but never as the authority: the teachings and practices of the Church itself were held to be of at least equal weight. The Catholic Church always insisted that the Bible could be easily misunderstood by those who lacked the proper training; this was why the Church discouraged Bible reading by laypeople until comparatively recently.

By the early modern era, however, the Catholic Church had become so corrupt that some Christian leaders (and many of the ordinary faithful) realised that the church was keeping an exclusive monopoly on spiritual power largely to suit its own worldly ends. In breaking with the church, these leaders – the Protestant Reformers – decided to return to the Bible as the only proper authority: sola scriptura, “Scripture only,” as the formula had it.

This in itself might not have been so problematic, but the Protestantism that reached the American frontier in the nineteenth century was dominated by men who had little education and little idea of any other literature than the Bible. Such people have always existed: Thomas Aquinas, the medieval Catholic theologian, was alluding to them when he said, “Timeo hominem unius libri”: “I fear a man of one book.” In the United States, and, I suspect, in much of the rest of the English-speaking world, evangelical Christianity has become co-opted by these “men of one book.” Today in many parts of the US, it is possible to go into people’s houses and see no other book than the Bible. It is this element in Christianity that has made its presence felt in the rise of fundamentalism.

As a result, the Bible’s inner meaning has increasingly become the province of esotericism. Regarding the story of Christ, in her book Esoteric Christianity the Theosophist Annie Besant speaks of “the Christ of the human Spirit, the Christ who is in every one of us, is born and lives, is crucified, rises from the dead, and ascends into heaven, in every suffering and triumphant ‘Son of Man.’” The story of Christ is thus the story of each of us; the Incarnation symbolises our own descent into the world of materiality, where we pass across the stage for a short while before being crucified on the cross of time and space. But this suffering and death is only transitory or even illusory, since the Logos – the principle of consciousness – in ourselves cannot die. It will be resurrected again in other forms, recognisable or otherwise. (In the Gospels the risen Christ is sometimes recognised by his disciples, sometimes not.)

Some may find themselves impatient with these ideas, insisting that they are nothing more than a way of skirting the issue of historical factuality that must supposedly serve as the bedrock of faith. But what, might one ask, is being dismissed as mere allegory? Viewed in the way sketched out above, the stories of the Exodus and the passion of Christ are not mere edifying tales of the past. Nor are they creeds for blind belief or flags around which to rally the faithful. Rather they are deep expressions of what is going on inside us now. To know from inner experience what it is to be spiritually in “the land of Egypt, the house of bondage,” to see the Logos in ourselves crucified on the cross of time and space, is not evasion but among the most profound insights a human being can have.

I would even take the argument a step further. An allegorical reading of the Bible can actually be more demanding than merely dwelling on the meaning of the letter. Acknowledging “Pharaoh,” “Moses,” the “scribes and Pharisees,” even Christ as parts of ourselves can be unsettling. Few are eager to come to grips with their inner tyrants and hypocrites, and there are possibly even fewer who can bear to see their own higher natures. After all, to know that Moses the lawgiver exists in oneself is already a step out of the house of bondage. To see the Christ within is already to experience a resurrection. Such realisations confer a responsibility upon us that we are not always delighted to face.

As a result, it is often easier to keep these things at the safe remove of antiquity – to follow the disputes about who was the Pharaoh of Exodus; to pore over accounts of recent excavations in Biblical Archaeology Review; to thrill over the latest news feature that breathlessly proffers some allegedly new fact about the historical Jesus. In such a way we can keep these issues alive, but at a comfortable distance: they remain ineluctably “other,” about people who lived long ago. I suspect that this dynamic helps explain the unshakable thirst for biblical archaeology among the American public.

All this said, there is admittedly a problem with leaning too heavily on allegorical readings of Scripture. To be no longer able to take one’s own myths literally – even while accepting them in a figurative sense – does strip them of their power. This is due to the limits of our own understanding; we as a civilisation seem unable to hear the message “Blessed are they that have not seen, and yet believed” (John 20:29). This is not a call to blind, stupid faith; it is an appeal to recognise realities that do not present themselves to our physical eyes and hands – the “evidence of things unseen.” But, trusting as we do in the Gradgrindian world of cold, hard facts, we put more trust in texts than in our own inner experience. We discover that the texts are not telling the exact truth about history, and we lose our faith.

Despite the noise (much of it overstated) about rising fundamentalism in the Western world, this loss of faith is likely to accelerate. What will happen when the news sinks in and we collectively understand that much, perhaps most, of the Bible is not literally true? We may continue to see their beauty and power as myths, just as we do with the tales of the Olympian gods, but they will have lost their numinous force for us. We will see the old gods mocked and derided, as they were in antiquity in the satyr plays of the classical Athenian stage and the satires of Lucian, and as we see today in films like Dogma and Jesus Christ Superstar.

In such instances, new myths, new versions of eternal truths arise. What these will be in the future remains to be seen; it is hard to imagine that they will come from any religion now existing. Of the models of reality now available, it is above all the one provided by science that has most captured the imagination of the thinking public. Like Christianity in ancient times, it seems to offer truth in place of myth, actualities in place of legend. And then we are left with a question that, I suspect, will not be answered in the lifetime of anyone reading these pages now: what will happen when the facts of science, implacably hard and substantial as they now seem, are proved to be myths in turn?

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Bibliography

Dante Alighieri, Letter to Can Grande della Scala, Translated by James Marchand, http://medieval.ucdavis.edu/20B/Can.Grande.html

Margaret Barker, The Great Angel: A Study of Israel’s Second God, Louisville, Ky.: Westminster/John Knox, 1992.

Annie Besant, Esoteric Christianity, or the Lesser Mysteries, Reprint, Wheaton, Ill.: Quest, 2006.

Harold Bloom, The American Religion, New York: Simon & Schuster, 1992.

Israel Finkelstein and Neil Asher Silberman, The Bible Unearthed: Archaeology’s New Vision of Ancient Israel and the Origin of Its Sacred Texts, New York: Touchstone, 2001.

Susan A. Handelman, The Slayers of Moses: The Emergence of Rabbinic Interpretation in Modern Literary Theory, Albany: State University of New York Press, 1982.

Origen, On First Principles, Translated by G.W. Butterworth, Reprint, New York: Harper & Row, 1966.

Philo, The Works of Philo, Translated by C.D. Yonge, Peabody, Mass.: Hendrickson, 1993.

Albert Schweitzer, The Quest of the Historical Jesus: A Critical Study of Its Progress from Reimarus to Wrede, Translated by W. Montgomery, Reprint, New York: Macmillan, 1961.

Ludwig Wittgenstein, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, Translated by D.F. Pears and B.F. McGuinness, 2nd edition, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1971.

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RICHARD SMOLEY is author of Inner Christianity: A Guide to the Esoteric Tradition; Hidden Wisdom: A Guide to the Western Inner Traditions (with Jay Kinney); and The Essential Nostradamus. His latest book is Conscious Love: Insights from Mystical Christianity. He is editor of Quest Books and is executive editor of Quest magazine. His web site is www.innerchristianity.com.

The above article appeared in New Dawn No. 110 (September-October 2008).

© Copyright New Dawn Magazine, http://www.newdawnmagazine.com. Permission granted to freely distribute this article for non-commercial purposes if unedited and copied in full, including this notice.

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Immortality as Consciousness

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As portions of the One, we are immortal. We have chosen to ‘play’ in space-time, the earth plane of Limitation. Caught in temporal mortal forms, our human body, veiled in the illusion of separation and Samsara, the cyclical ocean of death & birth, we fear our impending inevitable death.

While enjoying the adventure of Limitation, human beings since ancient times have fervently sought immortality. From the Akkadian Gilgamesh to the alchemist Sir Isaac Newton, eternal life has been the burning desire of many, especially the rich and powerful. Throughout our current Kali Yuga, all of written history, men and women have longed for immortality in the hope of prolonging their present identity and perhaps even bodily form. Yet most remain deluded — bound in our self-imposed sojourn.

There are now 176 billion observable galaxies. There are trillions of stars, each of which in all probability may have at lease one inhabitable planet awaiting life forms. There is no reason to assume that the numerous extra terrestrial races have no part in the seeding and colonization of planets. Indeed the idea that earth was seeded by various off-planet beings is not in conflict with the metaphysical traditions of consciousness and enlightenment found in the Sanskrit texts.

Ritual as Control

It appears that on occasion, the beings that colonized planet Earth, their priests and occultists, have offered their ‘chosen’ ones elaborate rituals, tests and quests that promised immortality. These chosen ones participated in elaborate, often costly and sacrificial rituals only to find themselves after death in yet another temporal realm – a slice of the myriad realms, the temporal astral planes, which they magnetized by the ritual practices. All these realms, every layer of 1000′s of heavens, hells and in-between are temporal, limited by time. Thus the ‘chosen’ who thought they were achieving immortality, found themselves eventually back in Samsara, the endless cycles of death & birth. They had not reached true immortality, the eternal imperishable One that pervades All — that which they were to begin with!

The idea that man could make himself immortal beyond time, through time-based priestcraft rituals and so-called ‘sacred’ material objects as instruments is a bit humorous. Everything is sacred. Immortality is not about life span, years in any particular bodily form, sharira. Real immortality is reaching God Consciousness, returning to our Source, That, the Tattva-ness we have always been. Therefore any and all elaborate secret arcane occult ritual dramas only got the’chosen’ ones to yet another temporal realm.

The Chandogya Upanishad III.6 explains the Real immortality, amritam, which is beyond the hands of time. The Seer Rishis reached immortality by ‘brooding’ on the verses in the Rig Veda, meaning they focused on the Wisdom Truth in the Sanskrit verses which are compared to the flowers of immortal nectar, a honey water that has the power to issue forth in its essence the birthless-deathless Reality. The wisdom woven in the verses holds the ineluctable power to immerse, absorb and return our consciousness into the One, the Source eternal beyond death and birth.

Our colonizers did indeed have much longer life spans than we earthlings. The Anunnaki were not the first of these colonizing races, but perhaps they were the last. One year for Anu, Enlil, Enki, Ninhursag, Inanna and the others is said to be 3600 of our human years. In terms of their years, they have not been ‘absent’ from our planet for very long. However they too die, even though we could not perceive their mortality because their allotted years greatly exceeded ours.

The Bhagavad Gita states that all manifest beings are mortal. In XVIII.40 Krishna says that no being, either on earth or in heaven among the ‘gods’ is free of Prakriti’s gunas, meaning the modes of material nature, the matrix that exists in time. Even the spheres of the Vedas, their rites and rituals, are said to be confined to the three gunas (sattva, rajas & tamas) and therefore belong to the plane of time. Krishna [BhG.II.45] urges his friend Arjuna to Become, to move beyond duality and liberate himself from the gunas, the power Shakti of Prakriti’s matrix.

Time Relative to the Vital Rhythms

Alain Danielou has a very insightful take on immortality in his book ‘While the Gods Play.’ He says that even though the duration of the gods may appear immense to our human consciousness, they are still “within the domain of multiplicity, the domain of Prakriti” and thus are mortal. How could these gods give us immortality when they do not themselves possess it?

Danielou states that the relative experience of time by various forms in creation is due to “the value that we attach to a given length of time…relative to our physical body. It is determined by the vital rhythms of each species.” Each life form has its own heartbeat and this vital rhythm dictates its duration in time.

Even though the immortality of the flesh is unobtainable, what was given to us is the sacred Wisdom-Knowledge to reach our own God-Consciousness that dwells within each of us. This knowledge was revealed and concealed in the Rig Veda. The Upanishads were written many years later and sought to illuminate the Rig Veda. “The Upanishads form a natural continuity of the glorious spiritual visions and realizations reached by the Rishis of the [Rig Veda] Samhitas… [T.V. Kapali Sastry].” The consciousness of mankind was continually ineluctably sinking into the solidification of matter through an increasing differentiated five-sense perception, as the Kali Yuga inexorably rolled on into ever-deeper density.

The colonizers of planet Earth were taken to be gods because they possessed advanced technology and seemed immortal to us. The term ‘gods’ in Sanskrit devas comes from the root √div and simply means shinning, luminescence, effulgence. The devas are the invisible (to the five senses) forces which play their part in the subtle body to generate the creative give-and-take relationship with the manifest external, the temporal illusory holographic universe. “The gods of the Vedic pantheon – Agni, Vayu, Indra, Surya – are frequently mentioned as having a double function as nature powers in the universe, (adhidaivatam), and as lords of the sense, life, mind and other instruments of the soul within us, (adhyatmam). [T.V. Kapali Sastry]”

Dead Ritual

The ‘gods’ have been personified throughout written history and tyrants have used this tool of the personification of ‘gods’ and the mythopoeisation of history [Malati J. Shendge] to control us through fear. Tyrants benefit from fear and endless destructive wars, many of which have been religious. Ritual has played its role and I quite like this description of the birth of ritual by the Sanskrit scholar, Malati J. Shendge — any ritual, yours and mine: “When the events became symbolic and were ascribed magical powers to attain certain aims, the process of mythopoeisation was complete. History was forgotten and dead ritual became the end in itself.”

Many of the Upanishads reject ritual. Swami Muni Narayana Prasad says that the Mundaka Upanishad “highlights the defects and weak points of Vedism and its ritual, and advises the seeker to become indifferent to them.” In the Bhagavad Gita II.45-6 Krishna says that Vedic rituals belong to the domain of Prakriti’s three gunas and tells Arjuna to ‘Become!’ without them; and further, he says that the Vedas are of no more use to the Self-Realized person than a well, when the entire land is flooded. Priestcraft rituals will not deliver immortality or Moksha, Liberation.

Sanskrit is a very difficult language to learn, and is said to take eighteen years to master all the subtleties of Sanskrit grammar. Naturally this arduous task left Sanskrit and therefore knowledge in the sacred Sanskrit texts, under the control of an elite. In India a guru was the only means to access the knowledge of the Vedas, Upanishads, etc. because unless you were born into the priest caste, you could not read the texts. Thanks to the many translations of these jewels of wisdom, people all over the world can now read the ancient sacred Sanskrit texts. Some of the translations are surely superior to others, just as there are good gurus and better ones. A translation made by an enlightened master is going to carry the power of that consciousness, and therefore be a more direct revelation.

With a sincere heart and dedicated purpose, I believe that we don’t necessarily require a guru. Certainly an enlightened teacher would be a wonderful experience, but even the Kashmir Shaivite saint and scholar, Swami Lakshmanjoo has said, “Don’t pin this on me!” In the last moments, it is up to us. As Krishna says [BhG.VI.5], we must lift ourselves up by the Self, Atmana. Swami Muni Narayana Prasad has also said that some do reach enlightenment by their own efforts, alone and without a guru.

Wisdom from Altair

In my book ‘Inanna Returns’ based on my visions of the Anunnaki colonization of our planet Earth, Inanna told me that when the geneticists Enki and Ninhursag created us, the lulus, they intentionally unplugged some of the genes. These genes in the human body were connected to our ability to realize that we are the One. The colonizing family did not want a worker race that refused to take orders or might rebel. Our ignorance of our origins served their purpose and kept us in the bow-down-and-worship phase of our evolution. I assumed that this was natural because the radiation wars seemed to coincide with the advent of the Kali Yuga — and thus the exposure to radiation pushed the human race into deeper ignorance and limitation.

Inanna said that when she was given the Indus Valley, she was already quite fed up with the increasingly chauvinistic attitudes of the males in her family and thus she resolved to attempt to activate the unplugged DNA. If you think of how many metaphysical systems there are in India, just imagine that throughout the universe there must be countless versions of primordial metaphysics, Truth, Satya, Rita (from the root meaning to rise, tend upward), the Eternal Right, Sanatana Dharma. Inanna called the system Samkhya, and because I did not want to add more to ET confusion, I said it originated in the Pleiades; but Inanna told me that what she taught was from Altair. Ninhursag’s mother came from the Altairian system and Ninhursag in turn, taught Inanna. Setting up what amounted to Tantric temples that practiced tantric rituals with trained priestesses and priests, Inanna determined to give the humans, the lulus, an advantage in consciousness.

‘God’ Genes

The immediate offspring of the Anunnaki already had better DNA, meaning they had abilities to access other dimensional realms that most of the worker race did not possess. When Enlil found out that Inanna was doing this, he was horrified, angry, and gave Marduk permission to destroy the Indus Valley civilization.

I don’t ask the reader to believe what I say here about the Indus Valley Civilization, but look at India – how amazing is it that the ancient Sanskrit texts were preserved. How incredible is it that the British thought that India’s ancient religious beliefs were not worth destroying. Remember that the Romans burned the ancient books in the Library of Alexander. I know — I died in that fire. Sometimes when I am copying a Sanskrit verse, I see the letters through the eyes of that lonely old man in the library at Alexandria, slowly methodically copying old Sanskrit written on dried palm leaves.

It is a miracle that we do have the Rig Veda, the Upanishads and the Bhagavad Gita, the essence of them all, to guide us Home.

Think of how often tyrannical dark forces have destroyed great civilizations, devastating the earth again and again, leaving the vast majority of mankind in poverty, fear, hunger, and ignorance. Wouldn’t our acceptance of wisdom teachings allow more to become enlightened? Who doesn’t want us to remember that we are portions of the One? Surely if everyone is God, then it can only be that there are designated beings whose ‘job’ description is playing the Darth Vader roles. In the Mahabharata, the character Duryodhana, who has played a primary part in starting the war, in fact is upon his death greeted with cheers and showers of flower petals by the ‘gods’ in the heavens. He is said to enjoy a heaven for those who have played their role, meaning he has lived out his own dharma and contributed to the adventure of limitation, the human drama.

I know this may sound a bit crazy at first, but consider this — if we all became enlightened at once, would the universe collapse? Who would there be to ‘play’ and mirror the myriad aspects of the One into the temporal illusory hologram? Yes, the bad guys do have a role, and this included the Anunnaki. Some of the family are in fact now trying to help us and many have incarnated in human flesh-and-blood bodies to activate the dormant genome. The hope is to re-establish the Satya Yuga, the era of Truth, and our collective memory of primordial metaphysics, without which there can be no harmony with the Creator, but only further delusion and dissolution.

Fear Propaganda as Control

The cacophony of a threat-matrix around the Anunnaki coming is just one more in a long line of ritual-rackets from the Fear Inc. tyrants who seek to keep mankind bewildered, confused, in fear and safely away from the Wisdom-Knowledge of our true Being, the One. Instead of rapid-fire running around the Internet, chasing mendacity and demons, and messing up the synaptic patterns in our brain that are conducive to contemplation, let us focus on our own consciousness within. There we will find Peace, lasting Love, integrity, truly useful power, and even our own Immortality.

For thousands of years the Sanskrit texts have held the secret key to our freedom and enlightenment, the recognition of our innate God-Consciousness within. That is the only immortality we have ever needed. The rest is mere delusion and deception. Just as the only real Free Will we possess is latent within us, so it is that true immortality awaits us within, in the Heart.

I often say to myself and I hope you have a sense of humour, because I mean this in the highest most sacred loving sense — I often say that God is crazy! God is crazy in Love for Its Creation. There is only one Soul, forever dancing in crazy Love, Its mad blissful Joy across thousands of universes.

We meet in the Heart,

V. Susan Ferguson

“The gods of the Vedic pantheon – Agni, Vayu, Indra, Surya – are frequently mentioned as having a double function as nature powers in the universe, (adhidaivatam), and as lords of the sense, life, mind and other instruments of the soul within us, (adhyatmam). [T.V. Kapali Sastry]”

About the Author

V. Susan Ferguson is the author of Inanna Returns, Inanna Hyper-Luminal; her own commentary on the Bhagavad Gita and the Shiva Sutras; and Colony Earth & the Rig Veda. Her website is Metaphysical Musing.

“The gods of the Vedic pantheon – Agni, Vayu, Indra, Surya – are frequently mentioned as having a double function as nature powers in the universe, (adhidaivatam), and as lords of the sense, life, mind and other instruments of the soul within us, (adhyatmam). [T.V. Kapali Sastry]”

Brihadaranyaka Upanishad, I.iv.10:

“And to this day, [those] who…know the Self as I am Brahman [the One], become all this universe.
Even the gods [any other dimensional beings] cannot prevent his becoming this, for he has become their Self. …if a man worships another deity thinking: He is one and I am another, he  does not know.
He [who does not know] is like a sacrificial animal to the gods. As many animals serve a man, so does each man serve the gods. Even if one animal is taken away, it causes anguish to the owner; how much more so when many are taken away!
Therefore it is not pleasing to the gods that men should know this [that they are the One].”

Resources: 

– Lights on the Upanishads, with Sri Aurobindo Darshana, by T.V. Kapali Sastry; Sri Aurobindo Kapali Sastry Institute of Vedic Culture, Bangalore, 1947, 2004.

– While the Gods Play, Shaiva Oracles and Predictions on the Cycles of History and the Destiny of Mankind, by Alain Danielou; Inner Traditions International, Rochester, Vermont, 1987.

– Bhagavad Gita, In the Light of Kashmir Shaivism, with original video, Revealed by Swami Lakshmanjoo, Edited by John Hughes, Co-editors Viresh Hughes and Denise Hughes; Universal Shaiva Fellowship, 2013.

– Life’s Pilgrimage Through The Gita, by Swami Muni Narayana Prasad; D.K. Printworld, New Delhi, 2005, 2008.

– The Bhagavad Gita in the Mahabharata, A Bilingual Edition, translated by J.A.B. van Buitenen; The University of Chicago Press, 1981.

– The Bhagavad Gita, translated by Winthrop Sargeant; State University of New York Press, 1994.

– Abhinavagupta’s Commentary on the Bhagavad Gita, Gitartha Samgraha, translated by Boris Marjanovic; Indica Books, Varanasi, 2002, 2004.

– The Civilized Demons: The Harappans in Rig Veda, Malati J. Shendge; Abhinav Publications, New Delhi, 1977.

– Satyaloka in the Rig Veda, A Study, by Dr. A. Venkatasubbiah (1886-1969); Vishveshvaranand Vedic Research Institute, 1974.

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Consciousness or Selfishness. Your Choice.

Selfishness concerns itself with one’s own welfare regardless of others and with giving less than the best to others. It may take the form of self-aggrandisement, self-glory, self-centerdness, self-doubt and many other “self” words, including self-control. Selfishness includes smugness, complacency, egotism, narcissism, conceit, perfectionism, arrogance, manipulation, denial, avoidance, fears, false pride, pretension, hypocrisy, pomposity, mistrust, condescension, indifference, presumptuousness, expectations, martyrdom, addictions, ambitions, jealousy, possessiveness, weakness, greed and control of others. All selfishness is a type of so-called sin. All evil is a type of selfishness. All selfishness is sinful and evil.

Unselfishness, besides being the opposite of the above, means giving generously to others as well as oneself for all the right reasons. It is being good when no one is watching, caring longer than anybody, loving anyway. Unselfishness is doing what you know to do even when you don’t feel like it. It’s not giving in to the impulses of the moment. It’s not making excuses for your own or anybody else’s failure. It is taking responsibility for what you are responsible for, and absolutely nothing else. It’s letting everybody do their own growing in spite of caring that they hurt. It is not letting them hurt alone. It’s intimate honesty and honestly intimate.

It’s letting others know what you want from them, and it’s lovingly letting go if they can’t give it.

Everything, and we really mean absolutely everything, is vibration. All vibrations seek their own level. Like begets like. Those who love unselfishly will ultimately, between earthly lives, experience the heavenly vibration of that attitude, while those who are negative and selfish will ultimately and rightly so experience the hellish vibration brought on by that. It doesn’t matter whether you believe it or not.

What we are trying to tell you is that there is nothing you can’t do when you are fully conscious. There is nothing you don’t know. And there is no place you consciousness can’t be. This of course is very scary for highly intelligent people who like to control others. Unselfish love is that which a person, who knows that he, is one with the universal spirit, does. Unselfish love is the way of the flow of the universe, the way of oneness. Unselfishness is the way of being in harmony with the universe. And is an instrument for doing the will of the Universal Consciousness. Unselfish love is both the end result of breaking our illusion of separateness, and a way of attaining oneness.

In retrospect, in times of suffering people are more aware of the constant, painful gnawing that exists from lack of inner peace. It reminds them, at least internally or subconsciously, about the great fact that suffering is caused by remaining separate and selfish, and this will never end unless we return to oneness with the Universal Spirit. We can never really be happy as selfish separate selves, never. We may have temporary high points, but that is it.

On the other hand, the pain of crucifying our selfishness is just temporary. And when we are done doing that, we have inner peace, which is the only true happiness, and the only happiness that never leaves us. Only those who have learned that the greater pain lies in separation from the oneness will choose the spiritual path. Are you willing to surrender?

If a person has attained Universal Consciousness they, by the very nature of that, cannot be simultaneously selfish. And if a person is still selfish, they cannot be one with the Universal Spirit, nor have Universal Consciousness. Many people’s spirituality excludes this simple fact, and many use sophisticated spiritual rationalization to actually maintain their selfish selves. Travelling on the spiritual path is made easier by humility, compassion and unselfish love. The greater our degree of humility and compassion, the easier, and shorter, our path back will be. Spiritual growth can be experienced as agonizing torture that we must endure, or as an enlightening, learning experience that we desire and relish. It all depends on our attitude.

True spiritual growth moves us away from the world of separateness and selfishness, towards Universal Consciousness and At-one-ment. Such a shift in consciousness can only result in caring for all, because we realise that all beings are us, all are in the Universal Spirit. Unselfish love radiates to all without exception, so powerfully that it transcends your separate self and is the Creator’s love flowing through you to others. You become the vessel channelling the universal spirit (while also being the universal spirit). It gives to all who would receive. Unless you approach the Universal Consciousness within yourself very soon, you will be left behind.

The opportunities for incarnating will be greatly diminished in the very near future, if at all. There simply won’t be enough bodies to go around, to incarnate into. As was said…”My spirit shall not dwell in man forever”, so stop wasting your time and, more importantly, don’t let other people waste your time. If you don’t try to get rid of your selfishness, and regain your Universal Consciousness, you are wasting your time and life. (That is what you are supposed to be doing here in this world) Ascension is in consciousness, going from a lower to a higher vibration. There are no physical rapture, that is an error. Flesh is flesh, and Spirit is Spirit. You don’t go to heaven; you grow to heaven by being kind to other people.

If man really knew better, he would do better. So be kind to others and know that ignorance and selfishness are the real evils. We are our brother’s keeper. If those intelligent people who are in a position to give of their means, talents, wealth, education and positions do not take this truth into consideration, then there must be that levelling which is to come. To our intelligent and intellectual friends, know that every other individual has as much right on Earth as we ourselves have, even though in some respect they may not be as far advanced in their learning.

Most people have lost so much awareness that they are not even aware of the fact that they are not aware that they are part of the great oneness. At present, as well as in the very near future, you will see tyranny, oppression, control and enslavement on a scale that is unprecedented. A helping hand will be offered to a collapsing world, a crime-ridden world. This hand will welcome you and want to take care of you, but watch out, for if you grasp it, it will make you a servant for the dark side. Think not that evil does not exist. True evil disguises itself and points fingers at innocents. Evil people are arrogant, feel mentally and intellectually superior, are greedy, speak lies and love power over others. They are masters of deception and secrecy, and are totally selfish. Evil seeks, with all its might, to destroy all those who would shine light into this world of darkness. That is also why I am using a previous name in penning this short script. From a higher perspective, the greatest evil on earth and in the hearts and minds of individuals is contention, fault-finding, lovers of self, selfishness and lovers of praise, because these forces separate consciousness. You create your own reality by attracting what you think about. The greatest good in the world is love, patience, kindness, forgiveness and understanding, because these forces unite. Evil is man’s misuse of the gift of free will. The creator allows this because free will is the only way for any soul to reach its original reason for existence: to know itself, to be itself, yet choosing to be one with, and in harmony with the whole, with the creator and the creation. If free will is taken away, then the soul no longer has the potential to become an eternal loving companion and co-creator. This is why souls who misuse their free will are allowed and given more time and lives to discover their true purpose, even if they do much harm along the way. Man will eventually learn that the Creators creation is better than his own feeble attempts. That Creators ways are better than his own funny ways, and that Creators Universal Consciousness is better than the little physical consciousness/intellect that men have in their primate like bodies. As can be seen at this time (2013), mankind is fast separating into two groups, the wheat and the chaff, the good and the bad, the loving and the hateful, the unselfish and the selfish, and most people gravitate towards one or the other. Where are you going? Like-minded people are now separating more and more from the opposite group to be among those of similar persuasion. If you don’t actively join in the cause of light, you are aiding the darkness, whether deliberately or not, whether you think so or not. Some people are becoming more and more kind and loving toward each other. Some are becoming more and more selfish, greedy and power hungry, showing very little love toward others. What do you think you are becoming? Your choices determine what you become, not your religion, not your religious belief or faith or intellectual reasoning; only your free will. Please use your free will with great humility and compassion to uplift your brothers and sisters, and to the glory of The Creator. Do not confuse this with what is mostly understood as religious dogma or theology, this is not.

Surrender to the universal one. Get back to Universal Consciousness any way you can, as quickly as you can. Time and times and half-time is at an end. At present we only live with a special and short-term dispensation. Selfishness is what must be crucified. Selfishness is what must die, and soon. Unless that is dead, you cannot be born again with Universal Consciousness.

All those who do not work for the light (toward universal consciousness) are, to varying degrees, pawns of darkness. You can meditate, you can pray, you can worship, you can do yoga, and you can go to church or the gym and look at the primate like ape in the mirror all day long. You can snort coke or smoke weeds or whatever. It is all a waste of time, it doesn’t help you become enlightened.  You should be kind, loving, caring and a harmless person. Just start by being really nice, kind and loving all the time to everybody. All human nature has one thing in common; they only operate at full potential when their concerns are directed away from self-preoccupation and towards the assistance of their less fortunate brothers.

From the other side with love,

On behalf of Leinep Noj, I am humbly Rene’ Descartes

About the Author

Rene’ Descartes is a frustrated desert veggie farmer in South Africa who ponders and wonders much about truth. Having sailed around the world on a small yacht over a 4 year period, Rene’ is now interested in healing the terminally ill and in being of assistance to the all the souls entering earth right now. Email Rene’ at Shamballa@wispernet.co.za.

This article is offered under Creative Commons license. It’s okay to republish it anywhere as long as attribution bio is included and all links remain intact.

via Consciousness or Selfishness. Your Choice. – Waking Times.