One Soul, Many Bodies: The Case for Reincarnation

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What happens to us when we die? It’s a question everyone eventually asks themselves at some point in their life. It transcends racial, social, political, economic and gender lines, making it the one question common to all human beings whether we like it or not.

Yet ever since the first men and woman began pondering their mortality a hundred thousand years ago, the answer has eluded us. What does happen when we die? What becomes of our soul, our mind, our personality – our very essence? For that matter, do we even have such a thing as a soul, or is it all an illusion we have created to give ourselves a sense of permanence and the hope of immortality?

The rationalist answers this query by proclaiming that since we are nothing more than a collection of cells and our brains simply tissue encased within a mantle of bone, nothing can happen to us when we die. The essence, personality, mind – soul – or whatever we wish to call our consciousness, ceases to exist, endowing our time on this planet with no more meaning than that which we choose to give it during our brief sojourn here. This is, of course, the position of the atheist, which is what makes atheism, in my opinion, so easy. It requires nothing because it offers nothing, which strikes me as a fair trade.

To most people, however, this answer is unsatisfactory. It suggests that we are little more than some great cosmic accident and that, consequently, our life has no ultimate purpose, forcing us to contemplate an existence without meaning in a universe that, despite all its beauty and splendour, has no more significance – or ultimate permanence – than a flower that briefly blooms in the spring only to wither and die after a few short days of vibrant life.

I suppose there are people for whom such a prospect is acceptable. It does, after all, tidy things up and make life simply a little game we sentient beings like to play for no particularly good reason other than because we have no choice. Yet something deep within the human heart knows better. We instinctively understand that we are more than the sum of our parts, which is why most people believe their personalities will survive their physical demise in some form and will continue on long after their bones have turned to dust. This, of course, brings us to our second option, which is that the personality/ego/true self/whatever you want to call it does survive the demise of the body to exist – at least for a time – as a separate disembodied consciousness. If this is the case, however, the next question that logically follows is what happens next?

Some believe, for example, that we become ghosts – little more than disembodied spirits aimlessly wandering the Earth, capable of perceiving the physical realm but unable to interact with it in any meaningful way. They can even point to various evidences to support this contention, from reported hauntings to automatic writing, séances, and apparent disembodied spirits caught on film.

While I personally have no problem with the idea of ghosts, I don’t think existing as a disembodied consciousness is truly a viable long-term option for what happens to us. Ghosts always struck me as being transitory; beings stuck on the Earth plane for a time only to ultimately move on and so essentially vanish from our physical realm. As such, even if we are to become ghosts, it will be, at least for the vast majority of us, a brief experience and not our eternity. I suspect we all eventually move on to ‘greener pastures’, so to speak.

Now, however, is where things get more interesting. Most people, regardless of whether they believe in ghosts or not, believe that the essence of who we are – our “soul” if you will – goes some place. Heaven is the favoured destination for most; a place where our conscious personality, no longer shackled to the limitations and burdens of physical existence, survives within a perpetual state of bliss and joy throughout eternity. Some add to this by also embracing a belief in hell; a perpetual state of torment for those who turn to evil and so are doomed to exist forever within a conscious state of agony, regret, and fear.

Both positions, however, suffer from the same problem, and that is that they see our time here on this planet as but a blink of the eye of eternity, with the decisions we make – or fail to make – while in the body having profound and eternal ramifications. Unfortunately, this reduces the physical world to little more than a cosmic hatchery that exists only to birth new souls, each of which will spend a short time in it before winging – or, potentially, plunging – to their ultimate destiny.

While admittedly this idea does manage to make this single life of paramount importance, it also forces one to wonder why a physical realm is necessary at all. If the physical universe exists merely as a vehicle for our creation, why couldn’t the process be circumvented entirely and we be created directly into the spiritual realm – as was supposedly the case with God’s angels?

Why all the unnecessary pain and hardship of a physical existence – especially if there exists the very real danger that we might earn hell through our misdeeds – if the spirit realm is the only destination that awaits us? In such a context, physical existence seems not only pointless but, in many ways, even hazardous.

So where does that leave us? If no Heaven and if no Hell, then what’s left?

There is a third position to consider. It is one that until recently has been largely ignored in the West but has been embraced by literally billions of people around the world for thousands of years. It is the belief that this physical existence is neither insignificant nor transient, but instead is perpetually ongoing. It is the concept that our soul lives on not in some ethereal Eden – or Hades – somewhere, but realises perpetual existence through a process of continual rebirths into the physical realm, making our time on this planet not one single, brief experience, but a repetitive process realised through literally hundreds of lifetimes. It is a timeless belief – one that predates both Christianity and Islam by many centuries – and one that is known by many names in many cultures. It’s been called rebirth, regeneration, transmigration of the soul, even metempsychosis, but is perhaps best known to us today as reincarnation.

Upon first consideration, especially to those who haven’t given the idea great thought, reincarnation may seem to be a foreign or exotic concept, especially to the Western mind steeped in the scientific method and drenched in two thousand years of monotheistic religion. It is something for Hindu holy men to ponder, or New Agers to embrace, but nothing that seems particularly relevant to most Westerners today.

I can easily understand this perspective for it is one I held myself for the first forty years of my life. And the truth be told, it is an Eastern concept – one in vogue more than four millennia before Christ was born and a belief held to by nearly two billion of the world’s population today – making it one of the oldest and most enduring belief systems known to man. In fact, it may be the original post-mortem belief among early humans who probably considered the idea when they began noticing strong similarities between recently born offspring and their deceased ancestors. Perhaps the mannerisms or interests a child displayed reminded one of a deceased loved one or a birthmark mimicked that found on a long-dead grandparent, leading village elders to imagine that the dead ancestor had returned a second time – a not unreasonable assumption in cultures that naturally assumed the soul to be inherently immortal.

Unfortunately, Westerners have traditionally had a tendency to consider foreign or primordial religious concepts as primitive and so reject them out of hand. However, this perception appears to be slowly changing as reincarnationist beliefs have become more prevalent in the West, especially in the last fifty years, and is becoming increasingly popular to ever growing numbers of people.

A Lost Western Tradition of How the Soul Returns

Of course, unbeknownst to most people, reincarnation has always been a part of Western thought. The prospect that the soul repeatedly returns to the flesh flourished in ancient Greece almost three thousand years ago and may have played a far more important role in our development as a civilisation than traditional histories have led us to believe. Aristotle, Socrates, Plato, and Pythagoras all taught and believed in some form of rebirth, the foundations of which were later adopted by the great Roman philosophers Ovid, Virgil, and Cicero, along with a host of other great thinkers of antiquity.

In fact, reincarnationist concepts were so prevalent in the centuries immediately preceding the birth of Christ, that they played a major role in many of the “mystery” religions of the Mediterranean; religions which were themselves to become the template for other later mystical faith systems of the region. Reincarnation, then, far from being a purely foreign concept was, in fact, widespread and may have strongly influenced the shape and thrust of Greek and Roman philosophy.

Even more of a surprise to many people, however, is the fact that reincarnationist concepts were also part of some of the more mystical branches of traditional Western religion, from the Sufis of Islam to the Gnostics of the early centuries of Christianity, and even within the Hasidic and Kabbalist traditions in Judaism. In fact, at times it virtually flourished and, especially in the case of Christianity, almost became the predominant belief system during the first few centuries of the Church’s existence until it was forced underground by the more traditional, non-reincarnationist branches of Christianity. Its proponent’s writings declared heretical and burned, the concept was so successfully suppressed by the Church of Rome that few Christians today even realise it was ever a part of their own faith.

Why was it suppressed? The obvious answer is because it threatened authority. Western religion is largely dependent upon the belief that man is destined to “die once and then be judged” to maintain control. In promising multiple rebirths, however, reincarnation renders the proclamations of the Pope or the Grand Mufti or whomever was the ruling head at the time transitory and, the truth be told, irrelevant. As such, reincarnation threatened the Church’s very livelihood, making it a very dangerous idea that had to be either suppressed or labelled as heretical in order for the Church to maintain its power base. As a result, the concept remained largely unknown outside of Asia for probably seventeen of the last twenty-one centuries.

Its revival in the West was imminent, however, with the arrival of the Age of Enlightenment in the eighteenth century. Once the long forgotten writings of the ancient Greeks again became available and one could hold to previously forbidden ideas without forfeiting their lives, such once forbidden concepts as reincarnation became increasingly popular, especially among the intellectual elite of the era. Amongst those who held to some form of multiple rebirths are such notables as Charles Dickens, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Benjamin Franklin, Shakespeare, Leonardo Da Vinci, and Voltaire, among others.

Interpreting What it Means to Reincarnate

However, since its reintroduction into the Western consciousness, reincarnation has undergone a transformation. It is no longer the unending “cycle of life” wheel taught by the Hindus and Buddhists, but has become a “school of higher education” designed to bring us to ever greater levels of spiritual enlightenment. This is why when a Hindu or a Buddhist and their fellow Western reincarnationist talk about the subject, it often appears as though they are speaking two different languages. This is because in some ways they are, which is where the confusion comes in.

To the Hindu, the soul is essentially stuck in a never ending cycle of rebirth which can never be broken due to the continual need to balance one’s karma. In effect, with each incarnation into the flesh, the human personality – a by-product of the underlying soul that birthed it – accumulates a degree of bad karma that must be worked off in order to restore balance to itself. Some of this karma can be worked off in life in the form of good works, but this is seldom sufficient to work off the entire debt, which must be accounted for in the next life by having the soul take on an incarnation that may be more difficult so the ongoing karmic debt can be worked off.

On rare occasions, a life may be so exemplary that the person might be born into a higher station (or caste in Hindu parlance) but as a rule, bad karma tends to outweigh good karma and, in being continually accumulated through each lifetime, adds to the growing debt that remains to be balanced and so perpetuating the rebirth cycle. (Of course, if one accumulates too much bad karma, they may not be reborn as a person at all, but could come back as an animal or even, in some teachings, an inanimate object such as a stone. This belief is called “transmigration of the soul” and is also a major element of Hindu teachings.)

Buddhism, on the other hand, while understanding the process of reincarnation in much the same way as does the Hindu, differs in that it teaches that the cycle of rebirth can be broken through achieving nirvana (literally, enlightenment), at which point the cycle is broken.

Enlightenment means essentially to be become aware of one’s true nature and to the realities contained within the Four Noble Truths as articulated by Gautama Buddha over two thousand years ago. These are: first, to be alive is to suffer due to the imperfection of human nature and the world around us; second, that the cause of suffering is attachment to transient things (in effect, craving or desiring things); third, that one can learn to let go of these attachments; and, finally, that the process of achieving enlightenment is progressive and may itself extend over many lifetimes.

In sharp contrast, to many Western reincarnationists, the purpose of rebirth is to learn the lessons we need to learn in each incarnation in order to advance to the next spiritual level which, while having some similarities to the Buddhist concept of slowly achieving enlightenment over a number of incarnations by practicing the Buddha’s Eightfold Path (right view, right intentions, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration), is actually quite different.

The Buddhist does not believe that one is “learning” new lessons with each lifetime, but simply applying the principles contained within the Eightfold Path until craving, ignorance, delusions and its effects gradually disappear as progress is made towards enlightenment. To the Western mindset, attachment is not seen as the source of the problem (though it does generally acknowledge that an obsessive attachment to things can be detrimental to spiritual growth).

Another significant difference between Eastern and Western concepts of reincarnation have to do with the perception of what it is, exactly, that is reincarnating. The Hindu sees the soul – the divine essence of God – as being the generator of each incarnation, with the individual personality or ego a transient expression of that soul.

In marked contrast, the Buddhist doesn’t believe in individualised souls at all, but believes the sense of self is merely an illusion created by our own perceptions – a conscious “memory” if you will, conceived by our assumption that we exist separately. To the Buddhist, we are all a part of a larger, divine consciousness that has simply taken on the very brief “illusion” that it is separate. The Buddhists compare our sense of existence to the waves upon the ocean; just as a wave is a temporary phenomena caused by wind and currents, our personality is equally as transient and is, upon death, absorbed back into the divine consciousness in the same way that a wave upon the ocean is eventually swallowed up by the ocean itself.

In the West, however, the personality – or ego – is more robust and generally considered immortal. To many, the soul and the personality are considered essentially synonymous, so as a result, when we die, our basic personality – complete with all its memories, life experiences, knowledge, and traits – returns in another body to continue its existence. It may not have a direct memory of its past life – though some people claim to be possess the ability to consciously remember their previous incarnations – but it is essentially the same personality starting life over again in another context.

The personality may experience dramatically new surroundings – for example, it may experience one incarnation as an Indian girl who lived and died in the nineteenth century and then return as a Spanish man in the twentieth century – but it is still the same “person” underlying each “role.” Of course, the experiences and environment it finds itself in through each subsequent incarnation will affect the base personality in both subtle and sometimes substantial ways, but this too is a part of the process. This is why the Westerner sees reincarnation in the context of “lessons.” After all, the Indian girl was able to experience and learn only so much in her short time on Earth, mandating that she return again – this time as a Spanish male – to learn those things she either neglected to learn or hadn’t the opportunity to learn in her previous incarnation.

This makes spiritual enlightenment a type of “to do” list that needs to be checked off in its entirety before we can cease the process of rebirth. (What happens after that is equally open to speculation among Westerners: some imagine we come back as avatars or spiritual teachers; others speculate that we start the process over again on another planet, while still others maintain that we move onto other dimensions. Apparently, the options available to the enlightened soul are extensive.)

I wonder, however, if the truth is not a conglomeration of each of these perceptions? Clearly the Eastern concepts of a parent soul that births each and every individual personality has merit, as does the Buddhist belief in the transient, temporary nature of the ego that is birthed. And the Western concept that we reincarnate until we learn what we need to know also has some validity and seems to parallel in some ways the Buddhist idea that the cycle of rebirth ends upon achieving enlightenment – however one chooses to define the term.

I often wonder if we aren’t all looking upon the same phenomena and not simply seeing only those parts of it that speak to us personally. I suspect our understanding of the purpose for reincarnation is lacking in many ways and may never be entirely complete, though I also believe we are making progress in coming to a fuller appreciation for its complexity and sophistication. Perhaps one day East and West will come together and merge their different perceptions and in so doing, form a complete whole that answers everyone’s questions.

Of course, I recognise that such may sound like a contradictory process. After all, how can there be a soul and yet not a soul, and how can the ego be immortal and yet transient? To combine both Western and Eastern concepts of reincarnation would seem to embrace paradox, but I have found it is often within the complexities of paradox that the truth exists. In fact, it is only our limited ability to understand that makes these apparent contradictions paradoxes in the first place.

I wonder if they would still appear as such were we to find the capacity within ourselves to truly understand on a level our current mental capacity does not permit. On the other hand, perhaps understanding these concepts is not done at a mind level, but on a spiritual level, which is a difficult place for many people to go.

Maybe in the end we were never meant to fully understand how reincarnation works, and that may be where the adventure really begins. Perhaps the question of what happens to us when we die was never meant to be answered but merely explored, for it is in seeking – not necessarily finding – the answer that growth can take place.

It may be, in fact, that it is only in abandoning our need to find the answers that we give them the ability to find us. In effect, we may be like the man who is so busy looking for treasure that he fails to realise he is searching for it within the bowels of a gold mine. Were he to but look up and see the treasure that shimmers all around him, he would realise how silly his fervent quest had been all along. Perhaps we need only do the same.

Jeff Allen Danelek’s latest book The Case for Reincarnation: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Soul (Llewellyn, 2010) is available from all good bookstores or via www.newdawnbooks.info.

If you appreciated this article, please consider a digital subscription to New Dawn.

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A native Minnesotan who currently resides in Colorado, JEFF ALLEN DANELEK has been working as a graphic artist and technical illustrator since leaving the Navy in 1984. He has been writing as a hobby for fifteen years, and enjoys presenting alternative theories on increasingly popular subjects dealing with the strange and inexplicable world around us. Danelek is regularly featured at seminars, conferences, and has been a frequent guest on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory and the X-Zone with Rob McConnell. His books include The Case for Ghosts, Atlantis: Lessons from a Prehistoric Civilization, UFOs: The Great Debate, and 2012: Extinction or Utopia: Doomsday Prophecies Explored. His latest book is The Case for Reincarnation: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Soul. Danelek is also a novelist and instructor at Colorado Free University. His website is www.ourcuriousworld.com.

The above article appeared in New Dawn Special Issue 14.

© Copyright New Dawn Magazine, http://www.newdawnmagazine.com. Permission granted to freely distribute this article for non-commercial purposes if unedited and copied in full, including this notice.

© Copyright New Dawn Magazine, http://www.newdawnmagazine.com. Permission to re-send, post and place on web sites for non-commercial purposes, and if shown only in its entirety with no changes or additions. This notice must accompany all re-posting.

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Mystery Teachings of Ancient Egypt

Partial Transcipt: (If this is something you’re into, visit the whole series on youtube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TIIsUdt-uO0&list=PLKM8Qh3arXk6zeJMAepphg7PZlxXX8nTL#t=62)

“With new knowledge sourced from Ancient Egypt and other keys such as the torah, sacred geometry, the fibonacci sequence, alchemy, hermetics, mythology and biblical scripture, we can now begin to put these fragments of knowledge and symbolism together and finally have an understanding of what has been hidden from us.

With this understanding we can unlock what was left to us by our very knowledgeable and wise forefathers. Unfortunately, this truth about our Divinity was taken from us with violence and torture and hoarded in a stronghold to the establishment otherwise known as the Vatican.

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But don’t be naive in thinking this information would also not be known by the Freemasons and the elite families and royalty. They took this knowledge for themselves and sold us a lie of death and hell. The Crusades were nothing more than an excuse to pillage and plunder all civilizations of this knowledge so it could be kept for themselves at the expense of the masses who they enslaved into bondage to serve only them. They murdered almost a million Cathars and stole all their scriptures and most sacred, holy texts. They called them heretics and sentenced them to the most painful deaths. Now all we have left are remnants of these ancient texts that survived destruction. The rest were stolen by the Catholics to be put together in a twisted version of scripture which they then used to lull the herd into a false belief of themselves and the reality in which they exist. Their agenda is to keep us in bondage to the physical plain so we cannot move into our ethereal body, and they do this by giving us a perception of limit and lack about ourselves.”

(he hasn’t yet mentioned the Gnostics, ”witches”, and the many others killed to keep the Literal story a belief, while the gnosis was kept hidden from us. He mentions our immortality and our power as Divine Principles of the Universe. I’ve been studying this subject for years and I can tell you that you will learn a lot from this video teachings series, but as always seek your own Self Intuitive Gnosis. Keep what resonates with you and put what doesn’t on a shelf. Don’t throw it away, it might make sense later in life. Peace my Sovereign brothers and sisters).

Thoth (Thought?)

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One of the greatest tragedies of the philosophic world was the loss of nearly all of the forty-two books of Hermes mentioned in the foregoing. These books disappeared during the burning of Alexandria, for the Romans–and later the Christians–realized that until these books were eliminated they could never bring the Egyptians into subjection. The volumes which escaped the fire were buried in the desert and their location is now known to only a few initiates of the secret schools. – Manly P. Hall (The Secret Teachings of All Ages)

THE BOOK OF THOTH

While Hermes still walked the earth with men, he entrusted to his chosen successors the sacred Book of Thoth. This work contained the secret processes by which the regeneration of humanity was to be accomplished and also served as the key to his other writings. Nothing definite is known concerning the contents of the Book of Thoth other than that its pages were covered with strange hieroglyphic figures and symbols, which gave to those acquainted with their use unlimited power over the spirits of the air and the subterranean divinities. When certain areas of the brain are stimulated by the secret processes of the Mysteries, the consciousness of man is extended and he is permitted to behold the Immortals and enter into the presence of the superior gods. The Book of Thoth described the method whereby this stimulation was accomplished. In truth, therefore, it was the “Key to Immortality.” According to legend, the Book of Thoth was kept in a golden box in the inner sanctuary of the temple. There was but one key and this was in the possession of the “Master of the Mysteries,” the highest initiate of the Hermetic Arcanum. He alone knew what was written in the secret book.

The Book of Thoth was lost to the ancient world with the decay of the Mysteries, but its faithful initiates carried it sealed in the sacred casket into another land. The book is still in existence and continues to lead the disciples of this age into the presence of the Immortals. No other information can be given to the world concerning it now, but the apostolic succession from the first hierophant initiated by Hermes himself remains unbroken to this day, and those who are peculiarly fitted to serve the Immortals may discover this priceless document if they will search sincerely and tirelessly for it. It has been asserted that the Book of Thoth is, in reality, the mysterious Tarot of the Bohemians–a strange emblematic book of seventy-eight leaves which has been in possession of the gypsies since the time when they were driven from their ancient temple, the Serapeum. (According to the Secret Histories the gypsies were originally Egyptian priests.) There are now in the world several secret schools privileged to initiate candidates into the Mysteries, but in nearly every instance they lighted their altar fires from the flaming torch of Herm. Hermes in his Book of Thoth revealed to all mankind the “One Way,” and for ages the wise of every nation and every faith have reached immortality by the “Way” established by Hermes in the midst of the darkness for the redemption of humankind.

Then was heard the voice of Poimandres, but His form was not revealed: “I Thy God am the Light and the Mind which were before substance was divided from spirit and darkness from Light. And the Word which appeared as a pillar of flame out of the darkness is the Son of God, born of the mystery of the Mind. The name of that Word is Reason. Reason is the offspring of Thought and Reason shall divide the Light from the darkness and establish Truth in the midst of the waters. Understand, O Hermes, and meditate deeply upon the mystery. That which in you sees and hears is not of the earth, but is the Word of God incarnate. So it is said that Divine Light dwells in the midst of mortal darkness, and ignorance cannot divide them. The union of the Word and the Mind produces that mystery which is called Life. As the darkness without you is divided against itself, so the darkness within you is likewise divided. The Light and the fire which rise are the divine man, ascending in the path of the Word, and that which fails to ascend is the mortal man, which may not partake of immortality. Learn deeply of the Mind and its mystery, for therein lies the secret of immortality.” ~  Manly P. Hall

(Not for the ‘profane’) This has been dated to at least 50,000 BC. It is amazing!
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The Emerald Tablets Of Thoth: http://www.horuscentre.org/library/Hermetism/The_Emerald_Tablets_Of_Thoth.pdf

Immortality as Consciousness

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As portions of the One, we are immortal. We have chosen to ‘play’ in space-time, the earth plane of Limitation. Caught in temporal mortal forms, our human body, veiled in the illusion of separation and Samsara, the cyclical ocean of death & birth, we fear our impending inevitable death.

While enjoying the adventure of Limitation, human beings since ancient times have fervently sought immortality. From the Akkadian Gilgamesh to the alchemist Sir Isaac Newton, eternal life has been the burning desire of many, especially the rich and powerful. Throughout our current Kali Yuga, all of written history, men and women have longed for immortality in the hope of prolonging their present identity and perhaps even bodily form. Yet most remain deluded — bound in our self-imposed sojourn.

There are now 176 billion observable galaxies. There are trillions of stars, each of which in all probability may have at lease one inhabitable planet awaiting life forms. There is no reason to assume that the numerous extra terrestrial races have no part in the seeding and colonization of planets. Indeed the idea that earth was seeded by various off-planet beings is not in conflict with the metaphysical traditions of consciousness and enlightenment found in the Sanskrit texts.

Ritual as Control

It appears that on occasion, the beings that colonized planet Earth, their priests and occultists, have offered their ‘chosen’ ones elaborate rituals, tests and quests that promised immortality. These chosen ones participated in elaborate, often costly and sacrificial rituals only to find themselves after death in yet another temporal realm – a slice of the myriad realms, the temporal astral planes, which they magnetized by the ritual practices. All these realms, every layer of 1000′s of heavens, hells and in-between are temporal, limited by time. Thus the ‘chosen’ who thought they were achieving immortality, found themselves eventually back in Samsara, the endless cycles of death & birth. They had not reached true immortality, the eternal imperishable One that pervades All — that which they were to begin with!

The idea that man could make himself immortal beyond time, through time-based priestcraft rituals and so-called ‘sacred’ material objects as instruments is a bit humorous. Everything is sacred. Immortality is not about life span, years in any particular bodily form, sharira. Real immortality is reaching God Consciousness, returning to our Source, That, the Tattva-ness we have always been. Therefore any and all elaborate secret arcane occult ritual dramas only got the’chosen’ ones to yet another temporal realm.

The Chandogya Upanishad III.6 explains the Real immortality, amritam, which is beyond the hands of time. The Seer Rishis reached immortality by ‘brooding’ on the verses in the Rig Veda, meaning they focused on the Wisdom Truth in the Sanskrit verses which are compared to the flowers of immortal nectar, a honey water that has the power to issue forth in its essence the birthless-deathless Reality. The wisdom woven in the verses holds the ineluctable power to immerse, absorb and return our consciousness into the One, the Source eternal beyond death and birth.

Our colonizers did indeed have much longer life spans than we earthlings. The Anunnaki were not the first of these colonizing races, but perhaps they were the last. One year for Anu, Enlil, Enki, Ninhursag, Inanna and the others is said to be 3600 of our human years. In terms of their years, they have not been ‘absent’ from our planet for very long. However they too die, even though we could not perceive their mortality because their allotted years greatly exceeded ours.

The Bhagavad Gita states that all manifest beings are mortal. In XVIII.40 Krishna says that no being, either on earth or in heaven among the ‘gods’ is free of Prakriti’s gunas, meaning the modes of material nature, the matrix that exists in time. Even the spheres of the Vedas, their rites and rituals, are said to be confined to the three gunas (sattva, rajas & tamas) and therefore belong to the plane of time. Krishna [BhG.II.45] urges his friend Arjuna to Become, to move beyond duality and liberate himself from the gunas, the power Shakti of Prakriti’s matrix.

Time Relative to the Vital Rhythms

Alain Danielou has a very insightful take on immortality in his book ‘While the Gods Play.’ He says that even though the duration of the gods may appear immense to our human consciousness, they are still “within the domain of multiplicity, the domain of Prakriti” and thus are mortal. How could these gods give us immortality when they do not themselves possess it?

Danielou states that the relative experience of time by various forms in creation is due to “the value that we attach to a given length of time…relative to our physical body. It is determined by the vital rhythms of each species.” Each life form has its own heartbeat and this vital rhythm dictates its duration in time.

Even though the immortality of the flesh is unobtainable, what was given to us is the sacred Wisdom-Knowledge to reach our own God-Consciousness that dwells within each of us. This knowledge was revealed and concealed in the Rig Veda. The Upanishads were written many years later and sought to illuminate the Rig Veda. “The Upanishads form a natural continuity of the glorious spiritual visions and realizations reached by the Rishis of the [Rig Veda] Samhitas… [T.V. Kapali Sastry].” The consciousness of mankind was continually ineluctably sinking into the solidification of matter through an increasing differentiated five-sense perception, as the Kali Yuga inexorably rolled on into ever-deeper density.

The colonizers of planet Earth were taken to be gods because they possessed advanced technology and seemed immortal to us. The term ‘gods’ in Sanskrit devas comes from the root √div and simply means shinning, luminescence, effulgence. The devas are the invisible (to the five senses) forces which play their part in the subtle body to generate the creative give-and-take relationship with the manifest external, the temporal illusory holographic universe. “The gods of the Vedic pantheon – Agni, Vayu, Indra, Surya – are frequently mentioned as having a double function as nature powers in the universe, (adhidaivatam), and as lords of the sense, life, mind and other instruments of the soul within us, (adhyatmam). [T.V. Kapali Sastry]”

Dead Ritual

The ‘gods’ have been personified throughout written history and tyrants have used this tool of the personification of ‘gods’ and the mythopoeisation of history [Malati J. Shendge] to control us through fear. Tyrants benefit from fear and endless destructive wars, many of which have been religious. Ritual has played its role and I quite like this description of the birth of ritual by the Sanskrit scholar, Malati J. Shendge — any ritual, yours and mine: “When the events became symbolic and were ascribed magical powers to attain certain aims, the process of mythopoeisation was complete. History was forgotten and dead ritual became the end in itself.”

Many of the Upanishads reject ritual. Swami Muni Narayana Prasad says that the Mundaka Upanishad “highlights the defects and weak points of Vedism and its ritual, and advises the seeker to become indifferent to them.” In the Bhagavad Gita II.45-6 Krishna says that Vedic rituals belong to the domain of Prakriti’s three gunas and tells Arjuna to ‘Become!’ without them; and further, he says that the Vedas are of no more use to the Self-Realized person than a well, when the entire land is flooded. Priestcraft rituals will not deliver immortality or Moksha, Liberation.

Sanskrit is a very difficult language to learn, and is said to take eighteen years to master all the subtleties of Sanskrit grammar. Naturally this arduous task left Sanskrit and therefore knowledge in the sacred Sanskrit texts, under the control of an elite. In India a guru was the only means to access the knowledge of the Vedas, Upanishads, etc. because unless you were born into the priest caste, you could not read the texts. Thanks to the many translations of these jewels of wisdom, people all over the world can now read the ancient sacred Sanskrit texts. Some of the translations are surely superior to others, just as there are good gurus and better ones. A translation made by an enlightened master is going to carry the power of that consciousness, and therefore be a more direct revelation.

With a sincere heart and dedicated purpose, I believe that we don’t necessarily require a guru. Certainly an enlightened teacher would be a wonderful experience, but even the Kashmir Shaivite saint and scholar, Swami Lakshmanjoo has said, “Don’t pin this on me!” In the last moments, it is up to us. As Krishna says [BhG.VI.5], we must lift ourselves up by the Self, Atmana. Swami Muni Narayana Prasad has also said that some do reach enlightenment by their own efforts, alone and without a guru.

Wisdom from Altair

In my book ‘Inanna Returns’ based on my visions of the Anunnaki colonization of our planet Earth, Inanna told me that when the geneticists Enki and Ninhursag created us, the lulus, they intentionally unplugged some of the genes. These genes in the human body were connected to our ability to realize that we are the One. The colonizing family did not want a worker race that refused to take orders or might rebel. Our ignorance of our origins served their purpose and kept us in the bow-down-and-worship phase of our evolution. I assumed that this was natural because the radiation wars seemed to coincide with the advent of the Kali Yuga — and thus the exposure to radiation pushed the human race into deeper ignorance and limitation.

Inanna said that when she was given the Indus Valley, she was already quite fed up with the increasingly chauvinistic attitudes of the males in her family and thus she resolved to attempt to activate the unplugged DNA. If you think of how many metaphysical systems there are in India, just imagine that throughout the universe there must be countless versions of primordial metaphysics, Truth, Satya, Rita (from the root meaning to rise, tend upward), the Eternal Right, Sanatana Dharma. Inanna called the system Samkhya, and because I did not want to add more to ET confusion, I said it originated in the Pleiades; but Inanna told me that what she taught was from Altair. Ninhursag’s mother came from the Altairian system and Ninhursag in turn, taught Inanna. Setting up what amounted to Tantric temples that practiced tantric rituals with trained priestesses and priests, Inanna determined to give the humans, the lulus, an advantage in consciousness.

‘God’ Genes

The immediate offspring of the Anunnaki already had better DNA, meaning they had abilities to access other dimensional realms that most of the worker race did not possess. When Enlil found out that Inanna was doing this, he was horrified, angry, and gave Marduk permission to destroy the Indus Valley civilization.

I don’t ask the reader to believe what I say here about the Indus Valley Civilization, but look at India – how amazing is it that the ancient Sanskrit texts were preserved. How incredible is it that the British thought that India’s ancient religious beliefs were not worth destroying. Remember that the Romans burned the ancient books in the Library of Alexander. I know — I died in that fire. Sometimes when I am copying a Sanskrit verse, I see the letters through the eyes of that lonely old man in the library at Alexandria, slowly methodically copying old Sanskrit written on dried palm leaves.

It is a miracle that we do have the Rig Veda, the Upanishads and the Bhagavad Gita, the essence of them all, to guide us Home.

Think of how often tyrannical dark forces have destroyed great civilizations, devastating the earth again and again, leaving the vast majority of mankind in poverty, fear, hunger, and ignorance. Wouldn’t our acceptance of wisdom teachings allow more to become enlightened? Who doesn’t want us to remember that we are portions of the One? Surely if everyone is God, then it can only be that there are designated beings whose ‘job’ description is playing the Darth Vader roles. In the Mahabharata, the character Duryodhana, who has played a primary part in starting the war, in fact is upon his death greeted with cheers and showers of flower petals by the ‘gods’ in the heavens. He is said to enjoy a heaven for those who have played their role, meaning he has lived out his own dharma and contributed to the adventure of limitation, the human drama.

I know this may sound a bit crazy at first, but consider this — if we all became enlightened at once, would the universe collapse? Who would there be to ‘play’ and mirror the myriad aspects of the One into the temporal illusory hologram? Yes, the bad guys do have a role, and this included the Anunnaki. Some of the family are in fact now trying to help us and many have incarnated in human flesh-and-blood bodies to activate the dormant genome. The hope is to re-establish the Satya Yuga, the era of Truth, and our collective memory of primordial metaphysics, without which there can be no harmony with the Creator, but only further delusion and dissolution.

Fear Propaganda as Control

The cacophony of a threat-matrix around the Anunnaki coming is just one more in a long line of ritual-rackets from the Fear Inc. tyrants who seek to keep mankind bewildered, confused, in fear and safely away from the Wisdom-Knowledge of our true Being, the One. Instead of rapid-fire running around the Internet, chasing mendacity and demons, and messing up the synaptic patterns in our brain that are conducive to contemplation, let us focus on our own consciousness within. There we will find Peace, lasting Love, integrity, truly useful power, and even our own Immortality.

For thousands of years the Sanskrit texts have held the secret key to our freedom and enlightenment, the recognition of our innate God-Consciousness within. That is the only immortality we have ever needed. The rest is mere delusion and deception. Just as the only real Free Will we possess is latent within us, so it is that true immortality awaits us within, in the Heart.

I often say to myself and I hope you have a sense of humour, because I mean this in the highest most sacred loving sense — I often say that God is crazy! God is crazy in Love for Its Creation. There is only one Soul, forever dancing in crazy Love, Its mad blissful Joy across thousands of universes.

We meet in the Heart,

V. Susan Ferguson

“The gods of the Vedic pantheon – Agni, Vayu, Indra, Surya – are frequently mentioned as having a double function as nature powers in the universe, (adhidaivatam), and as lords of the sense, life, mind and other instruments of the soul within us, (adhyatmam). [T.V. Kapali Sastry]”

About the Author

V. Susan Ferguson is the author of Inanna Returns, Inanna Hyper-Luminal; her own commentary on the Bhagavad Gita and the Shiva Sutras; and Colony Earth & the Rig Veda. Her website is Metaphysical Musing.

“The gods of the Vedic pantheon – Agni, Vayu, Indra, Surya – are frequently mentioned as having a double function as nature powers in the universe, (adhidaivatam), and as lords of the sense, life, mind and other instruments of the soul within us, (adhyatmam). [T.V. Kapali Sastry]”

Brihadaranyaka Upanishad, I.iv.10:

“And to this day, [those] who…know the Self as I am Brahman [the One], become all this universe.
Even the gods [any other dimensional beings] cannot prevent his becoming this, for he has become their Self. …if a man worships another deity thinking: He is one and I am another, he  does not know.
He [who does not know] is like a sacrificial animal to the gods. As many animals serve a man, so does each man serve the gods. Even if one animal is taken away, it causes anguish to the owner; how much more so when many are taken away!
Therefore it is not pleasing to the gods that men should know this [that they are the One].”

Resources: 

– Lights on the Upanishads, with Sri Aurobindo Darshana, by T.V. Kapali Sastry; Sri Aurobindo Kapali Sastry Institute of Vedic Culture, Bangalore, 1947, 2004.

– While the Gods Play, Shaiva Oracles and Predictions on the Cycles of History and the Destiny of Mankind, by Alain Danielou; Inner Traditions International, Rochester, Vermont, 1987.

– Bhagavad Gita, In the Light of Kashmir Shaivism, with original video, Revealed by Swami Lakshmanjoo, Edited by John Hughes, Co-editors Viresh Hughes and Denise Hughes; Universal Shaiva Fellowship, 2013.

– Life’s Pilgrimage Through The Gita, by Swami Muni Narayana Prasad; D.K. Printworld, New Delhi, 2005, 2008.

– The Bhagavad Gita in the Mahabharata, A Bilingual Edition, translated by J.A.B. van Buitenen; The University of Chicago Press, 1981.

– The Bhagavad Gita, translated by Winthrop Sargeant; State University of New York Press, 1994.

– Abhinavagupta’s Commentary on the Bhagavad Gita, Gitartha Samgraha, translated by Boris Marjanovic; Indica Books, Varanasi, 2002, 2004.

– The Civilized Demons: The Harappans in Rig Veda, Malati J. Shendge; Abhinav Publications, New Delhi, 1977.

– Satyaloka in the Rig Veda, A Study, by Dr. A. Venkatasubbiah (1886-1969); Vishveshvaranand Vedic Research Institute, 1974.

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