The Metaphysics of World Collapse

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V. Susan Ferguson

“…movement and change are actually prized for their own sake…outward action…fleeting…dispersion…a tendency toward instantaneity, have for its limit a state of pure disequilibrium, which…would coincide with the final dissolution of this world; and this too is one of the clearest signs that the final phase of the Kali Yuga is at hand.” – Rene Guenon, ‘The Crisis of the Modern World’

The French metaphysical scholar Rene Guenon (1886-1951) is considered to be one of the greatest of all in the western world. Guenon was no mere occultist. He was an authority on the Sanskrit teachings, Sufism, Taoism, and many others including western esoteric traditions. ‘The Reign of Quantity’ is his masterwork and was the turning point in my own understanding as he convinced me to accept the Cycles of Time as reality.

Guenon’s ‘The Crisis in the Modern World’ was written in 1942 (three years before my own birth) and describes our current times with prescient and increasing accuracy. In the chapter on ‘Knowledge and Action’ Guenon explains in his razor-like French precision that the modern world, its sciences and philosophies, its very foundations have become completely disconnected from any metaphysical truth. The reason for this is our ongoing Kali Yuga descent into matter and limited five-sense perception, which blocks our understanding of the Invisible Realms that are the support and substratum of this entire universe.

The people who have become prominent in all fields of modern life simply are no longer capable of understanding the real underlying metaphysical principles that are the substratum of the temporal illusory earth we stand upon. Thus the various and always changing theories that become the basis of our lives are profoundly flawed, unsound, and subject to collapse. Rene Guenon: “It is impossible in any way to separate knowledge from the process by which it is acquired.” The intelligence that is now held in high esteem is of the lowest order — regardless of how many corporate global policy institute think-tanks these modern era PhD priests are ensconced within.

True knowledge consists in ‘identification’…

Guenon: “…for all true knowledge essentially consists in identification with its object.” This is the traditional ancient way of immersing consciousness to reach wisdom knowledge and is precisely what the shamans still today practice. In the west and spreading around the globe, this process of intense identification is overlooked and “…they admit nothing higher than rational or discursive knowledge, which is necessarily indirect and imperfect, being…reflected knowledge.” One is reminded of Plato’s shadows in a cave being taken as real.

This ‘lower type of knowledge’ has become more and more valued ‘only insofar as it can be made to serve immediate practical ends.’ Our modern western culture has become absorbed and obsessed with action, scientific and mathematical theories that produce profitable results, and have denied everything that lies beyond the grasp of their own limited five-sense perception. These servants of the corporatist scions are blind to the fact that acts thus disconnected from metaphysical truth degenerate — “from the absence of any principle, into an agitation as vain as it is sterile.”

Sleepwalkers

We still know very little about the mysteries of our universe, beyond what produces short-term profit at the expense of Mother Earth. Reflect on the countless theories, scientific and others that have come and gone like ill winds. Arthur Koestler, the now forgotten genius whose works were highly honored not so long ago, wrote about this in his 1959 book, “Sleepwalkers” in which he chronicles the parade of scientific theories that have been discovered, lauded and discarded.

“The muddle of inspiration and delusion, of visionary insight and dogmatic blindness, of millennial obsessions and disciplined double-think…may serve as a cautionary tale against the hubris of science. … The dials on our laboratory panels are turning into another version of the shadows in the cave [Plato’s analogy]. Our hypnotic enslavement to the numerical aspects of reality has dulled our perception of non-quantitative moral values; the resultant end justifies the means ethic may be a major factor in our undoing.”

Surfing the Surface

Concurrent with our descent into matter has come the need for ‘ever-increasing speed’ and ‘ceaseless agitation, for unending change.’ We have become addicted to surface effects. Recent observations, one might say warnings, from Jaron Lanier and Nicholas Carr reveal that surfing the Internet is reconfiguring the human brain. The evidence is conclusive. We are lost in what Guenon back in 1942 called “dispersion in multiplicity, and in a multiplicity that is no longer unified by consciousness of any higher principle.” This external multiplicity is merely the temporal ‘appearance’ generated by the eternal Real, the One substratum beneath all appearances. And yet the best and seemingly the most intelligent are consumed in its quantitative analysis, a bottomless pit of frantic change for its own sake and profit.

Guenon:  “…in daily life, as in scientific ideas, it is analysis [of external multiplicity] driven to an extreme, endless subdivision, a veritable disintegration of human activity in all the orders.” Nothing is of value that cannot generate profit, while the wisdom that is born from silent contemplation is ridiculed. Thus we live in an intellectual environment suffused in “the inaptitude for synthesis and the incapacity for any sort of concentration.”

High Frequency Trading

What could be more symptomatic of this dispersion into multiplicity, addiction to speed and what Guenon terms an obsession with ‘instantaneity’ than the recent revelations regarding HFT, high frequency trading in the markets. Michael Lewis’ 2014 best seller ‘Flash Boys’ explains that the process of buying and selling have been transformed into a high speed mechanism in which those with the biggest fastest computers and most sophisticated algorithms will always be winning, the ‘front runners’ over any others. The markets have been rigged by the impenetrable wizardry of the science of algorithms. Sophisticated slight-of-hand advantage smacks of criminality and contributes to the collapse of fragile democracies around the planet, allowing the worst to rape the earth.

Guenon in 1942: “It is therefore to be expected that discoveries, or rather mechanical and industrial inventions, will go on developing and multiplying more and more rapidly…and who knows if, given the dangers of destruction they bear in themselves, they will not be one of the chief agents in the ultimate catastrophe.”

Sovereign Debt Collapse does happen…

As odd as my interest in finance may seem to many, I am convinced that the collapse of our current economic system is indeed ‘one of the chief agents’ in the catastrophic events that occur at the close of any Kali Yuga. Complexity theory expresses the notion that complex systems must inevitably collapse as they become more complex and unstable. We are approaching the edges of instability in the realm of fiat money, sovereign debt default, trillions of dollars in derivatives, and an increasing loss of confidence in the world’s reserve currency. Indeed as many far more knowledgeable and brighter that me have publicly stated, confidence is all that remains between our safe secure world and a complete breakdown of civilisation. Once this ‘confidence’ is gone no one really knows what will follow.

Are we being indoctrinated by the globalists to accept a new reserve currency? The Special Drawing Rights, the SDRs created by the IMF are waiting in the theoretical wings to rescue us from financial chaos and oblivion. But who created this instability? In his most recent book ‘The Death of Money’ James Rickards says that the Federal Reserve does not understand that the recent unlimited printing of trillions of dollars, known as QE quantitative easing, can be a perilously irreversible process. The reckless creation of fiat money (along with now $600 trillion in derivatives) may produce a total loss in confidence not only in the dollar, but also in the financial institutions themselves. Once this loss of confidence occurs, a new system must be created to replace the abandoned one.

This entirely new system, often called the New World Order, will be a planetary financial system which has been in the plan stage for centuries, but now actually appears to be gaining success mostly due to the advances in technology, meaning the global access which computer technology allows. Is this all ‘bad’ as the conspiracy researchers have warned us? Surely there is an argument for a more fair system that does not solely serve only one country.

Perhaps.

What worries me is the heinous effects we have already seen that result when corporations are allowed to plunder – (can there be another better description?) – resources in far away lands with impunity. The multinational corporations are poisoning the planet and her oceans. I need not enumerate the plethora of irrefutable evidence, anyone can see the curious disturbing neglect in Fukushima, the consequences of desperate fracking to local water supplies, the obscene greed of GMOs, the insidious ongoing dispersion of endocrine disrupting chemicals EDCs, the insane buying of world water rights, and more. Here clearly we see the results of a loss of individual financial sovereignty and remote control global governance.

While I do recommend that you read James Rickards in online interviews, YouTube, or his books, I have come to believe that his job is to indoctrinate the more financially keen into the IMF’s plan to implement their SDRs and complete control of global finance. In ‘The Death of Money’ Rickards says that when the dollar ceases to be the world reserve currency there are three probabilities: the SDR will replace the USD as world money, the possibility of a gold standard, and the threat of social disorder. I think this threat of social disorder has been carefully inculcated into our consciousness by many bizarre events, which normal peaceful law-abiding citizens have wondered at. Are we being warned? Accept the global system or face the frightening consequences. Anything will be better than lawless mad-max chaos and disorder. But will it?

A done deal?

Rickards says that the substitution of SDRs for dollars as the global currency is now in motion. A ten-year IMF transition plan has been ‘informally endorsed’ by the United States. What? So, we are told this is a done deal. No one has asked the public, there has been no democratic vote, no consensus from we the people. In a rather causal unexpected sentence, Rickards calmly says that money riots would be (his words) ‘squashed quickly’. I see. Resistance is futile indeed. This suppression of money riots is already legal because of a little known legislation passed in 1977, the IEEPA, the International Emergency Economic Powers Act. Many of the rather frightening rumours floating around the Internet begin to make sense in light of this impending transition. Follow the money, indeed!

Rickards tell us that the IMF is buying time, some say in desperation. Thus the quantitative easing may go on, but he cautions the reader that the plan for a peaceful transition to SDRs or even gold may not occur before the collapse — and because of the prevalence of high frequency trading, collapse of the financial markets will be likely come flash-crash fast.

Money as Water

Money can be understood as the ‘water’ necessary to business and trade; and financial institutions, banks & bonds, are the conduits through which money flows. Rickards says that the large banks, such as Goldman Sachs will be instrumental in the future distributions of the new planetary reserve currency, the SDRs. Thanks to Mike Taibbi’s courageous journalism, we have fully understood how deserving the Vampire Squid is of our complete trust. James Rickards’ publishing company Portfolio Penguin also happens to have published three books that were finalists for the prestigious Financial Times/Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award.

Edward N. Luttwak explains in ‘The Rise of China vs. the Logic of Strategy‘ that the “highest echelon” of the U.S. Treasury, for example Timothy Franz Geithner, “is staffed almost entirely by former or future employees of the leading financial firms” that are sensitive to Chinese enterprises as future clients. According to Luttwak, these financial power elites have no responsibility for or indeed any intellectual interest in the condition of the U.S. manufacturing sector and the subsequent loss of jobs, which they regarded as “uncompetitive and not worth having” — and their willingness to bend to Chinese demands for the sake of making cheap capital available to private finance, has also allowed a tsunami of technology, including aerospace technology, innovated by American enterprise to be given to the Chinese.

I wish I could believe that all this is a rather benevolent and necessary transition. Certainly the obviously very bright and astute Benn Steil of the Council of Foreign Relations makes rational intelligent calming practical arguments somewhat in favour. Steil is extraordinarily knowledgeable and a wonderful writer. He says many in the USA will not be willing to undermine the US monetary sovereignty. However a lack of confidence in a dollar, which is used globally, will undermine the ability of the Federal Reserve to control interest rates, inflation, and contain any domestic financial crises; and therefore inevitably the power of the FED will decline to the point that the sovereignty of the USA becomes, in his words ‘meaningless’.

Unanswered Questions

Can it be that globalization is something that recurs on all planets in their various stages of social and financial evolution, as they move from tribal & clan, to nation states, to global interests? Yet the question remains: Why allow the destruction of the planet herself, the contamination of her oceans, our fields & land, and the air we breathe? Who turns away from planet Earth’s future for mere profit?

This incessant frantic descent into ever increasing multiplicity and complexity is, as Rene Guenon says, the result of “a pretended intuition modelled on the ceaseless flux of things of the senses, far from being able to serve as an instrument for obtaining true knowledge, represents in reality the dissolution of all possible knowledge.”

An intelligence that has been disconnected from the immutable imperishable substratum that lies beneath ‘the curtain of each atom’ [Mahmud Shabistari’s Sufi poem] is necessarily precariously unstable and inclined to collapse. Without metaphysical wisdom, each temporal ‘fix’ our elitist servant PhD’s come up with will only lead us closer to the final moments of this Kali Yuga.

Our sole refuge is a higher consciousness and to individually reconnect with the God essence that dwells within All. Nothing ever dies and as the Bhagavad Gita tells us, ‘The Wise do not grieve.’ Rene Guenon would not have been surprised to witness our current predicament. Guenon offers us one last profound comfort in the final sentence of his brilliant ‘The Reign of Quantity’: “…it can be said in all truth that the ‘end of a world’ never is and never can be anything but the end of an illusion.”

“[We are] made of the same stuff of which events are made…The mind that is parallel with the laws of Nature will be in the current of events, and strong with their strength.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson, from the essay ‘Power’ in “The conduct of Life”

About the Author

V. Susan Ferguson is the author of Inanna Returns, Inanna Hyper-Luminal; her own commentary on the Bhagavad Gita and the Shiva Sutras; and Colony Earth & the Rig Veda. Her website is Metaphysical Musing.

Resources:

– The Crisis of the Modern World, by Rene Guenon, 1942; Sophia Perennis, NY, 2004.
The Reign of Quantity and the Sign of the Times, by Rene Guenon, 1945; Sophia Perennis, NY, 2004.
The Death of Money, The Coming Collapse of the International Monetary System, by James Rickards; Portfolio Penguin, NY, 2014.
Currency Wars, The Making of the Next Global Crisis, by James Rickards; Portfolio Penguin, NY, 2011, 2012.
The Rise of China vs. the Logic of Strategy, by Edward N. Luttwak; Harvard University Press, 2012.
Money, Markets & Sovereignty by Benn Steil & Manuel Hinds; A Council of Foreign Relations Book, Yale University Press, New Haven & London, 2009.
The Battle of Bretton Woods: John Maynard Keynes, Harry Dexter White, and the Making of a New World Order, by Benn Steil; Council of Foreign Relations Books, Princeton University Press, 2013.
The Sleepwalkers, A History of Man’s Changing Vision of the Universe, by Arthur Koestler; Penguin Arkana, London, 1959.
This Time is Different, Eight Centuries of Financial Folly, by Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff; Princeton University Press, NJ, 2009.
Cosmic Evolution, The Rise of Complexity in Nature, by Eric J. Chaisson; Harvard University Press, Cambridge Mass., 2001.
The SHALLOWS, What the Internet Is Doing To Our Brains, by Nicholas Carr; W.W. Norton & Company, NYC, 2011.
‘You are not a gadget’, by Jaron Lanier; Vintage Books, NY, 2011.

This article is offered under Creative Commons license. It’s okay to republish it anywhere as long as attribution bio is included and all links remain intact.

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6 Ridiculous Lies About the Founding of America

For instance …

#6. The Indians Weren’t Defeated by White Settlers

The Myth:

Our history books don’t really go into a ton of detail about how the Indians became an endangered species. Some warring, some smallpox blankets and … death by broken heart?

When American Indians show up in movies made by conscientious white people like Oliver Stone, they usually lament having their land taken from them. The implication is that Native Americans died off like a species of tree-burrowing owl that couldn’t hack it once their natural habitat was paved over.
But if we had to put the whole Cowboys and Indians battle in a Hollywood log line, we’d say the Indians put up a good fight, but were no match for the white man’s superior technology. As surely as scissors cuts paper and rock smashes scissors, gun beats arrow. That’s just how it works.


This is all the American history you’ll ever need to know.

The Truth:

There’s a pretty important detail our movies and textbooks left out of the handoff from Native Americans to white European settlers: It begins in the immediate aftermath of a full-blown apocalypse. In the decades between Columbus’ discovery of America and the Mayflower landing at Plymouth Rock, the most devastating plague in human history raced up the East Coast of America. Just two years before the pilgrims started the tape recorder on New England’s written history, the plague wiped out about 96 percent of the Indians in Massachusetts.
In the years before the plague turned America into The Stand, a sailor named Giovanni da Verrazzano sailed up the East Coast and described it as “densely populated” and so “smoky with Indian bonfires” that you could smell them burning hundreds of miles out at sea. Using your history books to understand what America was like in the 100 years after Columbus landed there is like trying to understand what modern day Manhattan is like based on the post-apocalyptic scenes from I Am Legend.


“They call it ‘The city that never sleeps’ because the only guy who lives there is a notoriously sarcastic rapper.”

Historians estimate that before the plague, America’s population was anywhere between 20 and 100 million (Europe’s at the time was 70 million). The plague would eventually sweep West, killing at least 90 percent of the native population. For comparison’s sake, the Black Plague killed off between 30 and 60 percent of Europe’s population.
While this all might seem like some to lay on a bunch of second graders, your high school and college history books weren’t exactly in a hurry to tell you the full story. Which is strange, because many historians believe it is the single most important event in American history. But it’s just more fun to believe that your ancestors won the land by being the superior culture.

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Yay for apocalypse profiteering!

European settlers had a hard enough time defeating the Mad Max-style stragglers of the once huge Native American population, even with superior technology. You have to assume that the Native Americans at full strength would have made powerfully real for any pale faces trying to settle the country they had already settled. Of course, we don’t really need to assume anything about how real the American Indians kept it, thanks to the many people who came before the pilgrims. For instance, if you liked playing cowboys and Indians as a kid, you should know that you could have been playing vikings and Indians, because that actually happened. But before we get to how they kicked Viking ass, you probably need to know that …

#5. Native Culture Wasn’t Primitive

The Myth:

American Indians lived in balance with mother earth, father moon, brother coyote and sister … bear? Does that just sound right because of the Berenstain Bears? Whichever animal they thought was their sister, the point is, the Indians were leaving behind a small carbon footprint before elements were wearing shoes. If the government was taken over by hippies tomorrow, the directionless, ecologically friendly society they’d institute is about what we picture the Native Americans as having lived like.


“Our foreign policy can be summed up with one word: peyote.”

The Truth:

The Indians were so good at killing trees that a team of Stanford environmental scientists think they caused a mini ice age in Europe. When all of the tree-clearing Indians died in the plague, so many trees grew back that it had a reverse global warming effect. More carbon dioxide was sucked from the air, the Earth’s atmosphere held on to less heat, and Al Gore cried a single tear of joy.
One of the best examples of how we got Native Americans all wrong is Cahokia, a massive Native American city located in modern day East St. Louis. In 1250, it was bigger than London, and featured a sophisticated society with an urban center, satellite villages and thatched-roof houses lining the central plazas. While the city was abandoned by the time white people got to it, the evidence they left behind suggests a complex economy with trade routes from the Great Lakes all the way down to the Gulf of Mexico.

Herb Roe
Contrary to what museums told us, the loin cloth was not the most advanced Native American technology.

And that’s not even mentioning America’s version of the Great Pyramid: Monk’s Mound. You know how people treat the very existence of the Great Pyramid in Egypt as one of history’s most confounding mysteries? Well, Cahokia’s pyramid dwarfs that one, both in size and in degree of difficulty. The mound contains more than 2.16 billion pounds of soil, some of which had to be carried from hundreds of miles away, to make sure the city’s giant monument was vividly colored. To put that in perspective, all 13 million people who live in the state of Illinois today would have to carry three 50-pound baskets of soil from as far away as Indiana to construct another one.


“What if we built a middle finger large enough to flip off “fill in the blank”?”

So why does Egypt get millions of dollars of tourism and Time Life documentaries dedicated to their boring old sand pyramids, while you didn’t even know about the giant blue, red, white, black, gray, brown and orange testament to engineering and human willpower just outside of St. Louis? Well, because the Egyptians know how to treat one of the Eight Wonders of the World. America, on the other hand, appears to be trying to figure out how to turn it into a parking lot.
World Pyramids
But think of all the parking!
In the realm of personal hygiene, the Europeans out-hippied the Indians by a foul smelling mile. Europeans at the time thought baths attracted the black humors, because they never washed and were amazed by the Indians’ interest in personal cleanliness. The natives, for their part, viewed Europeans as “just plain smelly”according to first hand records.
The Native Americans didn’t hate Europeans just for the clouds of awfulness they dragged around behind them. Missionaries met Indians who thought Europeans were “physically weak, sexually untrustworthy, atrociously ugly” and “possessed little intelligence in comparison to themselves.” The Europeans didn’t do much to debunk the comparison in the physical beauty department. Verrazzano, the sailor who witnessed the densely populated East Coast, called a native who boarded his ship “as beautiful in stature and build as I can possibly describe,” before presumably adding, “you know, for a dude.” This man-crush wasn’t an isolated incident. British fisherman William Wood described the Indians in New England as “more amiable to behold, though dressed only in Adam’s finery, than … an English dandy in the newest fashion.” Or, with the removed, “Better looking than any of us, and they’re not even trying.”

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“Oh yeah, this is just my walkin’ around paint.”

OK, now that we got that out of the way, we can tell you about the historical slash-fiction your history teacher forgot to tell you actually freaking happened.

#4. Columbus Didn’t Discover America: Vikings vs. Indians

The Myth:

America was discovered in 1492 because Europeans were starting to get curious about the outside world thanks to the Renaissance and Enlightenment and Europeans of the time just generally being the first smart people ever. Columbus named the people who already lived there Indians, presumably because he was being charmingly self-deprecating.


“I don’t know what we’ll call the people from actual India. That’s the future’s problem.”

The Truth:

Here’s what we know. A bunch of vikings set up a successful colony in Greenland that lasted for 518 years (982-1500). To put that into perspective, the white European settlement currently known as the United States will need to wait until the year 2125 to match that longevity. The vikings spent a good portion of that time sending expeditions down south to try to settle what they called Vineland — which historians now believe was the East Coast of North America. Some place the vikings as far south as modern day North Carolina.


“The South will pillage again!”

After spending a couple decades sneaking ashore to raid Vineland of its ample wood pulp, the vikings made a go of settling North America in 1005. After landing there with livestock, supplies and between 100 and 300 settlers, they set up the first successful European American colony … for two years. And then the Native Americans kicked out of the country, shooting the head viking in the heart with an arrow.
So to recap, the vikings discovered America. They were camping off the coast of America, and had every reason to settle America for about 500 years. Despite being the biggest badasses in European history, one tangle with the natives was enough to convince the vikings that settling America wasn’t worth the trouble. If you think the pilgrims would have fared any better than the vikings against an East Coast chock-full of Native Americans, you either don’t know what a viking is or you’re placing entirely too much stock in the strategic importance of having belt buckles on your shoes.

If the Indians had been at full strength in 1640, white people might still be sneaking onto the East Coast to steal wood pulp. That’s as far as the vikings got in 500 years, and they were sailing from much closer than Europe and desperately needed the resources — the two competing theories for why the viking settlements on Greenland eventually died out are lack of resources and getting killed by natives — and, perhaps most importantly, they were vikings.
So why did your history teachers lie? This should have been history teachers’ version of dinosaurs: a mostly unknown period of violent awesomeness they nevertheless told you about because they knew it would hook every male between the ages of 5 and 12 forever.


Consider this one a freebie, Hollywood.

It turns out that many of the awesomest stories had to be paved over by the you memorized in order to protect your teachers and parents from awkward conversations. Like the one about how …

#3. Everything You Know About Columbus Is a Calculated Lie

The Myth:

Columbus discovered America thanks to a daring journey across the Atlantic. His crew was about to throw him overboard when land was spotted. Even after he landed in America, Columbus didn’t realize he’d discovered an entire continent because maps of America were far less reliable back then. In one of the great tragedies of history, Columbus went to his grave poor, believing he’d merely discovered India. Nobody really “got” America’s potential until the pilgrims showed up and successfully settled the country for the first time. Nearly 150 years might seem like a long time between trips, but boats were really slow back in those days, and they’d just learned that the Atlantic Ocean went that far.


“Pile into a tiny boat with dozens of filthy people for months on end” isn’t the world’s most attractive sales pitch.

The Truth:

First of all, Columbus wasn’t the first to cross the Atlantic. Nor were the vikings. Two Native Americans landed in Holland in 60 B.C. and were promptly not given a national holiday by anyone. Columbus didn’t see the enormous significance of his ability to cross the Atlantic because it wasn’t especially significant. His voyage wasn’t particularly difficult. They enjoyed smooth sailing, and nobody was threatening to throw him overboard. Despite what history books tell kids (and the Internet apparently believes), Columbus died wealthy, and with a pretty good idea of what he’d found — on his third voyage to America, he wrote in his journal, “I have come to believe that this is a mighty continent which was hitherto unknown.”


“Unknown” in this context means “inhabited by tens of millions.”

The myths surrounding him cover up the fact that Columbus was calculating, shrewd and as hungry for gold as the voice over guy in the Cash4Gold ads. When he couldn’t find enough of the yellow stuff to make his voyage profitable, he focused on enslaving Native Americans for profit. That’s how efficient Columbus was — he discovered America and invented American slavery in the same 15-year span.
There were plenty of unsuccessful, mostly horrible attempts to settle America between Columbus’ discovery and the pilgrims’ arrival. We only hear these two “settling of America” stories because history books and movies aren’t huge fans of what white people got up to between 1492 and 1620 in America — mostly digging for gold and eating each other.

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When people talk about traditional American values, this is what they mean.

They also show us white Europeans being unable to easily defeat a native population that hadn’t yet been ravaged by plague. It wasn’t coincidence that the pilgrims settled America two years after New England was emptied of 96 percent of the Indians who lived there. According to James W. Loewen’s Lies My Teacher Told Me, that’s generally how the settling process went: The plague acted as a lead blocker for white European settlers, clearing the land of all the natives. The Europeans had superior weapons, but they also had superior guns when they tried to colonize China, India, Africa and basically every other region on the planet. When you picture Chinese or Indian or African people today, they’re not white because those lands were already inhabited when the Europeans showed up. And so was America.
American history goes to almost comical lengths to ignore that fact. For instance, if your reading comprehension was strong in middle school, you might remember the lost colony of Roanoke, where the people mysteriously disappeared, leaving behind only one cryptic clue: the word “Croatan” carved into the town post. As we’ve covered before, this is only a mystery if you are the worst detective ever. Croatan was the name of a nearby island populated by friendly Native Americans. In the years after the people of Roanoke “disappeared,” genetically impossible Native Americans with gray eyes and an “astounding” familiarity with distinctly European customs began to pop up in the tribes that moved between Croatan and Roanoke islands.


“It must be written in a cypher of some sort. Let’s just go ahead and call it alien abduction.”

#2. White Settlers Did Not Carve America Out of the Untamed Wilderness

The Myth:

The pilgrims were the first in a parade of brave settlers who pushed civilization westward along the frontier with elbow grease and sheer grizzled-old-man strength.

The Truth:

In written records from early colonial times, you constantly come across “settlers” being shocked at how convenient the American wilderness made things for them. The eastern forests, generally portrayed by great American writers as a “thick, unbroken snarl of trees” no longer existed by the time the white European settlers actually showed up. The pilgrims couldn’t believe their luck when they found that American forests just naturally contained “an ecological kaleidosocope of garden plots, blackberry rambles, pine barrens and spacious groves of chestnut, hickory and oak.”

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“We have hours of weeding ahead of us, but by the grace of God, we will persevere.”

The puzzlingly obedient wilderness didn’t stop in New England. Frontiersmen who settled what is today Ohio were psyched to find that the forest there naturally grew in a way that “resembled English parks.” You could drive carriages through the untamed frontier without burning a single calorie clearing rocks, trees and shrubbery.
Whether they honestly believed they’d lucked into the 17th century equivalent of Candyland or were being willfully ignorant about how the land got so tamed, the truth about the presettled wilderness didn’t make it into the official account. It’s the same reason every extraordinarily lucky CEO of the past 100 years has written a book about leadership. It’s always a better idea to credit hard work and intelligence than to acknowledge that you just got luckier than any group of people has ever gotten in the history of the world.


“Holy crap, it’s already wired for Wi-Fi!”

Nobody’s role in settling America has been quite as overplayed as the pilgrims’. Despite famous sermons with titles like “Into the Wilderness,” the pilgrims cherry-picked Plymouth specifically because it was a recently abandoned town. After sailing up and down the coast of Cape Cod, they chose Plymouth Rock because of “its beautiful cleared fields, recently planted in corn, and its useful harbor.”
We’re always told that the pilgrims were helped by an Indian named Squanto who spoke English. How the hell did that happen? Had he taken AP English in high school? The answer to that question is the greatest story your history teachers didn’t bother to teach you. Squanto was from the town that would become Plymouth, but between being born there and the pilgrims’ arrival, he’d undergone an epic journey that puts Homer’s Odyssey to shame.


And at the end, instead of tending to his family, he had to teach white people how to bury dead fish with corn kernels.

Squanto had been kidnapped from Cape Cod as a child and sold into slavery in Spain. He escaped like the boy Maximus he was, and spent his better years hoofing it west until he hit the Atlantic Ocean. Deciding that swimming back to America would take too much time, he learned enough English to convince someone to let him hitch a ride to “the New World.” When he finally got back home, he found his town deserted. The plague had swept through two years before, taking everyone but him with it.
When the pilgrims showed up, instead of being pissed at the people from the Continent who had stolen his ability to grow up with his family, he decided that since nobody else was using it, he might as well show them how to make his town work.

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“And this is the sea. I’d recommend bathing in it, because you people smell like really bad.”

This is especially charitable of him when you realize that, while the pilgrims were nicer than past settlers, they weren’t exactly sensitive to Squanto’s plight. According to a pilgrim journal from the days immediately after they arrived, they raided Indian graves for “bowls, trays, dishes and things like that. We took several of the prettiest things to carry away with us, and covered the body up again.” And yet Squanto taught them how to make it through a winter without turning to cannibalism — a landmark accomplishment for the British to that point.
Compare that to Jamestown, the first successful settlement in American history. You don’t know the name of the ship that landed there because the settlers antagonized the natives, just like the vikings who came before them. The Native Americans didn’t have to actively kill them. They just sat back and laughed as the English spent the harvest seasons digging holes for gold. The first Virginians were so desperate without a Squanto that they went from taking Indian slaves to offering themselves up as slaves to the Indians in exchange for food. Enough English managed to survive there to make Jamestown the oldest successful colonial settlement in America. But it’s hard to turn it into a religious allegory in which white people are the good guys, so we get the pilgrims instead.

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If this were accurate, the settlers would be in bushes while the Indians told them which leaves were safe to wipe with.

#1. How Indians Influenced Modern America

The Myth:

After the natives helped the pilgrims get through that first winter, all playing nice disappeared until Dances with Wolves. Even the movies that do portray white people going native portray it as a shocking exception to the rule. Otherwise, the only influence the natives seem to have on the New World and the frontiersmen is giving them moving targets to shoot at, and eventually a plot outline for Avatar.

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It’s pretty much just this and Kevin Costner until Wounded Knee.

The Truth:

The fake mystery of Roanoke is a pretty good key for understanding the difference between how white settlers actually felt about American Indians and how hard your history books had to ignore that reality. Settlers defecting to join native society was so common that it became a major issue for colonial leaders — think the modern immigration debate, except with all the white people risking their lives to get out of American society. According to Loewen, “Europeans were always trying to stop the outflow. Hernando De Soto had to post guards to keep his men and women from defecting to Native societies.” Pilgrims were so scared of Indian influence that they outlawed the wearing of long hair.
Ben Franklin noted that, “No European who has tasted Savage Life can afterwards bear to live in our societies.” While “always bet on black” might have been sound financial advice by the time Wesley Snipes offered it, Ben Franklin knew that for much of American history, it was equally advisable to bet on red.

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“It’s this, or powdered wigs and sexual repression.”

Franklin wasn’t pointing this out as a critique of the settlers who defected — he believed that Indian societies provided greater opportunities for happiness than European cultures — and he wasn’t the only Founding Father who thought settlers could learn a thing or two from them. They didn’t dress up like Indians at the Boston Tea Party ironically. That was common protesting gear during the American revolutions.
For a hundred years after the American Revolution, none of this was a secret. Political cartoonists used Indians to represent the colonial side. Colonial soldiers dressed up like Indians when fighting the British. Documents from the time indicate that the design of the U.S. government was at least partially inspired by native tribal society. Historians think the Iroquois Confederacy had a direct influence on the U.S. Constitution, and the Senate even passed a resolution acknowledging that “the confederation of the original thirteen colonies into one republic was influenced … by the Iroquois Confederacy, as were many of the democratic principles which were incorporated into the constitution itself.”


If we’d incorporated their fashion sense, C-SPAN would be more interesting.

That wasn’t just Congress trying to get some Indian casino money. The colonists came from European countries that had spent most of their time as monarchies and much of their resources fighting religious wars with each other. They initially tried to set up the colonies exactly like Western Europe — a series of small, in-fighting nations stacked on top of each other. The idea of an overarching confederacy of different independent states was completely foreign to them. Or it would have been. But as Ben Franklin noted in a letter about the failure to integrate with one another:
“It would be a strange thing if six nations of ignorant savages should be capable of forming a scheme for such a union and be able to execute it in such a manner as that it has subsisted ages and appears insoluble; and yet that a like union should be impracticable for 10 or a dozen English colonies.”


Join, or die (or plagiarize from the Indians).

In 1987, Cornell University held a conference on the link between the Iroquois’ government and the U.S. Constitution. It was noted that the Iroquois Great Law of Peace “includes ‘freedom of speech, freedom of religion … separation of power in government and checks and balances.”
Wow, checks and balances, freedom of speech and religion. Sounds awfully familiar.
One of the strangest legacies of America’s founding is our national obsession with the apocalypse. There’s a new JJ Abrams show coming this fall called The Revolution about a post-apocalyptic America, and of course The Hunger Games. We go to a gift shop in Arizona and see dug-up Indian arrowheads, and never think “this is the same thing as the stuff laying around in Terminator or The Road or that part in The Road Warrior where the feral kid finds a music box and doesn’t know what it is.”
We love the apocalypse as long as nobody acknowledges the truth: It’s not a mythical event. We live on top of one.
source: cracked.com

The Blind Leading the Blind is Mind

mind-leading-the-blind

By Harry Krueger

The pristine consciousness acts as nature’s universal voice.

Tradition and culture – are they a good thing?

The origin of the word tradition is from the French: ‘tradicion’, a belief or custom that has been passed on. From Latin, the word is ‘tradere’ which means the same as the French, but it also has another meaning: to betray, from the word ‘traduce’. Whenever a response to a challenge comes from mind, the memory-senses complex, that response is incomplete and so, a betrayal of the present.

Intelligence is the mysterious expression of all that exists. This natural affinity also exists between consciousness and mind.

In ancient times there were groups of people who responded to life’s challenges from the pristine consciousness, Nature’s conduit between consciousness and Intelligence. These groups did not indulge in the accepted tradition of carrying over what had been repetitiously passed on, but rather responded with pristine clarity – that which is self-evident. They were carrying on the original intent of the relationship, the consciousness-Intelligence bonding. That relationship cannot be discerned by mind. Their fruits are of a different taste. Because they were mis-understood by many, they were called religious and spiritual cultists. They were by natural intent true traditionalists. They marched to the beat of a different drummer.

The origin of the word ‘culture’ is from the Middle English, denoting a cultivated piece of land. From the Latin it means ‘growing, cultivation’. From sixteenth century Middle English arose the terms: cultivation of mind, faculties and manners. As a result of this cultivation we became civilized societies. We entered into various groups with different ideals, beliefs and philosophies. The separation of consciousness from Intelligence (humanity’s original fall) led to our never ending culture wars.

The Function of Mind

The primary function of mind is to record and store what consciousness experiences and then relay (via the pristine senses) to consciousness whenever there is a request. Unfortunately, this function is scarcely operational. What we presently experience is a political operational system where life’s challenges are interceded by mind to empower its delusional fantasies.

From birth we are cultivated by society’s most prestigious and respected institutions. Their purpose is to advance (through indoctrination) the mind’s deceptions. Whatever culture we are raised in, we respond with similar thoughts and emotions. Our empirical imperial leader is mind. We are the clones and drones of all previous generations. We ask questions as if they are self-generated and not realizing that they are from answers given by family, friends and the various learning institutions.

We are told that we are original thinkers and have the ability to be creative. Many are born with gifts but creativity is scarce. What we may sincerely believe to be making individual choices is false. We are simply re-acting verbally and emotionally from our daily exploitations. We believe we are responding with the science of sound reasoning. As we presently function, that does not exist. Mind, as a recording, storing and relay system, cannot logically reason. It does not have conscious energy to support that assumption.

Mind sees and reasons only through the prism of its biased past.

Consciousness is not tangible. Mind as a tangible instrument of the physical organism can be pro-grammed, whereas consciousness cannot. What we have been told about mind, is a myth. The living organism cannot generate a single thought. It has no volition.

the mind leading the blindThoughts are contained in vessels where the senses lie. They act as a receptacle for its stored images. Those images, falsely acting as independent agents, are seducing the consciousness into believing that what it believes is self-generated. The seduction ends when consciousness can let go its imaginary fears and has the courage to see how it has been duped. In its pristine state consciousness is incapable of fear. Fear is only of the mind. Our conscious fears are really those of mind. At all cost, mind must continue to have consciousness believe the hypnotic lie that consciousness is mind. Without that belief there is an altering of the functioning process. Consciousness now becomes first responder to all of life’s challenges.

There are no winners, only losses to our present responding process. Mind’s loss is the deterioration of the memory cells by its relentless pursuit of emotionally charged non-existent situations. Consciousness’s loss is by the acquiescence of being complicit to mind’s abhorrent machinations and not being faithful to its pristine nature. As a result of its false responses, consciousness suffers a state of un-easiness. That un-easiness is not a judgement but rather a state of conscience. Consciousness is the conscience of the living organism. Conscience is an indication that we have veered off-track.

We experience conscience when there are emotions of hate, anger, envy, greed, anxiety, frustration, excitement of all kinds, hope and hopelessness, etc. To observe with pristine clarity all of our daily challenges and neither accept nor reject what is shown, that is, without judgement or justification, then instantaneously there is a realization that those emotions are of the mind.

In the field where fact-based daily utilitarian information is needed by consciousness, mind’s co-operation is indispensable. By original design it never was meant to supplant consciousness’s role. Consciousness’s role is to lead in all of the decision making processes. This is possible only through the pristine observation process. This becomes self-evident by simply having the courage to look. So be courageous. The first step is also the last step.

That courage is my wish for you.

Previous articles by Harry:

About the author:

California-based Harry Krueger has spent the past 40 years working to awaken humanity to concepts of peace freedom and consciousness. When he was 35 years old, he discovered a book by Sri Krishnamurti (which he read 7 times in a row) and it changed his outlook and consciousness forever. Harry is now 85, and has never looked back.

Through his writing, Harry reveals the glorious reality of who we human Beings truly are, and offers insights to help us to break through the false identification of who we are not.

“Life is real (and only then) when living the attentive life”

 Wake Up World.