War On The Poor

The “War on Poverty” has become a war on the poor. This recently hit home for me via some family member’s remarks on a meme I posted. I understand. Sometimes it must seem that getting up for work everyday just to keep up with the bills and trying to make it through life is harder than it should be. The middle class are being beat up pretty bad compared to the not too distant past when workers had excellent unions, great medical insurance and retirement pensions. With those rapidly disappearing benefits and the high cost of living, due to inflation, illegal wars, banker bailouts, etc, these middle class workers disparately need an enemy to blame for how fucked up everything is. That someone is poor people, who, so they’re told, are mooching up tax dollars and getting rich off welfare. Well we can indeed have our own opinions, but let’s please base our opinions on facts. Let’s get some facts:

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I think anyone who can see the facts might stop blaming the poor, but that’s only if we’re talking about logical sane people. We’re talking about people programmed to work till they croak, and suck the mainstream media’s tit for life. But assuming some of these haters could really see that less than 4 cents of a dollar goes to helping the poor? What if they saw that only 2 cents goes to educating our children? We’re creating dissatisfied working drones by the millions. And there’s no jobs for them even at the lowest level.  And what if they saw who was getting out of paying taxes? Might that make them less hateful little drones? Well, don’t be silly, of course it won’t. But at least sane people can see the facts and form an opinion based on reality, another disappearing quality in America. Some more facts:

Image3taxesJust look at that! It takes such little effort to switch the focus away from the facts and create a scapegoat for these lowly working bees to blame. Oh, it sucks alright. Some of the younger people have taken to beating homeless people to death with bats. Hate gets real bent out of shape in the real world. No one gets rich on welfare. No one wants to be on welfare when asked what they want to be when they grow up. It’s a shell game the elites play to distract attention from themselves and what they’re getting away with. If possible, at least if you find one of these mentally ill haters, try to get the facts to them. All that anger should at least be shared with the real villains.

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Hypatia of Alexandria

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Excerpted from “War Against the Pagans,” in Secret History of the Witches © 2000 Max Dashu

… The Roman state gave free rein to Christian extremists who destroyed pagan shrines and images, or who committed violence against pagan leaders. They attacked people at pagan services and destroyed their temples. Arson was a favorite tactic.  From the late 300s on, monks stand out as the primary aggressors in the battle to suppress pagans in the east. Even Christian documents describe them as violent and crime-prone, beating people they considered sinful, stirring up sectarian strife. [MacMullen, 171-2] The pagan Eunapius remarked that these monks looked like men but lived like pigs, “and openly did and allowed countless unspeakable crimes.” [Eunapius, 423] He added bitterly, “For among them, every man is given the power of a tyrant who has a black robe and is prepared to behave badly in public.” [Hollland-Smith, 170] Some were not above murder.

One target of the fanatical monk was Hypatia, an astronomer, mathematician and philosopher of international reputation. Socrates Scholasticus wrote that “she far surpassed all the philosophers of her time,” and was greatly respected for her “extraordinary dignity and virtue.” [Ecclesiastical History] Hypatia’s house was an important intellectual center in a city distinguished for its learning. Damasius described how she “used to put on her philosopher’s cloak and walk through the middle of town” to give public lectures on philosophy. [Life of Isidore, in the Suda]

Admired by all Alexandria, Hypatia was one of the most politically powerful figures in the city. She was one of the few women who attended civic assemblies. Magistrates came to her for advice, including her close friend, the prefect Orestes. [Damasius, Socrates Scholasticus] In the midst of severe religious polarization, Hypatia was an influential force for tolerance and moderation. She accepted students, who came to her “from everywhere,” without regard to religion.

Hypatia was a Neoplatonist. Some have claimed that she does not really qualify as a pagan, only as a rationalist philosopher. But this description is inaccurate and misleading. First, the meaning of “philosopher” had changed considerably by late antiquity, encompassing even Christian ascetics. [MacMullen, 205 fn 24] Second, such a narrow definition of paganism fails to recognize, as its enemies did, that it constituted a much broader spectrum than temple rites and theurgy. The sacred books of the Neoplatonists were pagan—Orpheus, Homer, the Chaldean Oracles—and they embraced “the esoteric doctrines of the mysteries.” [Cumont, 202] Third, Neoplatonist philosophers were persecuted as pagans, and identified as such in the struggle over the temples. They joined and even led in the pagan defense of the Serapium in Alexandria.

One of these leaders, Antoninus, had been initiated by his mother, Sosipatra of Pergamum, a Neoplatonist philosopher and mystic seeress. Antoninus “foretold to all his followers that after his death the temple would cease to be, and even the great and holy temples of Serapis would pass into formless darkness and be transformed, and that a fabulous and unseemly gloom would hold sway over the fairest things on earth.” The Serapium was razed in 391, the year after Antoninus died. [Eunapius, 416-7] …

Hypatia’s father Theon was an astronomer and mathematician who was devoted to divination and astrology and the pagan mysteries. He wrote commentaries on the books of Orpheus and Hermes Trismegistus and poems to the planets as forces of Moira (destiny). Nothing indicates that Hypatia departed from her home culture. The Chaldean Oracles and Pythagorean numerological mysticism figured in her teachings, as the letters of Synesius indicate. Like her father, she saw astronomy as the highest science, opening up knowledge of the divine.

The surviving fragments of Hypatia’s teachings indicate a mystical orientation. Glimpses of her spiritual views survived in the letters of her disciples, which speak of “the eye buried within us,” a “divine guide.” As the soul journeys toward divinity, this “hidden spark which loves to conceal itself” grows into a flame of knowing. Hypatia’s philosophy was concerned with the “mystery of being,” contemplation of Reality, rising to elevated states of consciousness, and “union with the divine,” the One. [Dzielska, 54-5, 48-50]

Her disciples certainly regarded her in the light of a spiritual leader. Synesius of Cyrene called her “the most holy and revered philosopher,” “a blessed lady,” and “divine spirit.” Though a Christian, he refers to “her oracular utterances” and writes that she was “beloved by the gods.” [Dzielska, 47-8, 36] She spoke out against dogmatism and superstition: “To rule by fettering the mind through fear of punishment in another world, is just as base as to use force.” [Partnow, 24] Unquestionably, Hypatia’s teaching represented a challenge to church doctrine. The apparent destruction of her philosophical books underlines the point. Her mathematical works survived and were popular into the next century.

Damasius wrote that “The whole city rightly loved her and worshipped her in a remarkable way…” Her popularity galled Cyril, the new bishop of Alexandria, who “was so struck with envy that he immediately began plotting her murder…” [Damasius, op. cit.] The bishop’s enmity was also fueled by political motives: the politics of religious intolerance and domination.

When Cyril became bishop in 412, he began pushing to extend his power into the civic sphere. His enforcers were the parabalanoi, strongmen who had been the shock troops of bishop Theophilus’ war on pagans and Jews. Bishop Cyril persecuted heterodox Christian groups, closing their churches and expelling them from the city. He spread rumors of a Jewish conspiracy to murder Christians and instigated a brawl between Jews and Christians at a theater. The Jews protested that the bishop’s agents had provoked the fight. The prefect Orestes (himself a Christian) heard out their grievances and arrested one of the bishop’s allies. In 414, armed conflict broke out between Cyril’s supporters and the embattled Jews. It ended with the looting and seizure of synagogues, and the bishop expelling the ancient Jewish community from Alexandria.

Many Christians in the city sided with Orestes and put pressure on Cyril to desist. Instead, he escalated the conflict, calling in hundreds of monks from the desert. They mobbed Orestes in the streets, calling him a “sacrificer” and “Hellene”—in other words, a pagan. [Chuvin, 87-9] The monks hurled stones, wounding him in the head.  The prefect’s bodyguards fled, but a crowd of bystanders jumped in to save his life.

Accusations of Witchcraft

Realizing that he was losing on public relations, the bishop changed tactics. Now he attempted to turn the people against Hypatia as a powerful woman by accusing her of harmful sorcery. A later church chronicler, John of Nikiu, explained that “she beguiled many people through satanic wiles.” It was Hypatia’s “witchcraft” that kept the prefect Orestes away from church and made him corrupt the faith of other Christians. Further, she was involved in divination and astrology, “devoted at all times to magic, astrolabes and instruments of music.” [John of Nikiu, Chronicle 84. 87-103, Online: <http://cosmopolis.com/alexandria/hypatia-bio-john.html&gt; 7-20-01]

In March of 415, Peter the church lector led a mob in attacking Hypatia as she rode through the city in her chariot. Socrates Scholasticus wrote that “rash cockbrains”  dragged her into the Caesarion church, stripped her naked, and tore into her body with pot-shards, cutting her to pieces. Then they hauled her dismembered body to Cinaron and burned it on a pyre. [Alic, 45-6] John Malalas accords with Socrate’s statement that the mob burned Hypatia’s remains. Hesychius’ account agrees that the mob tore Hypatia to pieces, but simply says that “her body [was] shamefully treated and parts of it scattered all over the city.” [Dzielskaielska, 93]

In John of Nikiu’s version, men came for “the pagan woman who had beguiled the people of the city and the prefect through her enchantments.” They found her sitting in a chair and dragged her through the streets until she was dead, then burned her body.[Chronicle, 84.87-103] After Hypatia’s assassination, Orestes disappeared (fled? assassinated?). Cyril prevailed, and his parabalanoi were never punished for killing Hypatia. The bishop covered up her murder, insisting that she had moved to Athens.

No one was fooled. Our nearest contemporary sources agree that the bishop was behind the witch-rumors and the killing, and that his men carried them out. Public opinion may be measured by the fact that Christian city officials continued appealing to imperial officials to curb the parabalanoi, to bring them under secular control and restrict them from public places. They were only partially successful, since the imperial court itself was in the midst of a crackdown on pagans. As for Cyril, whom John of Nikiu credits with destroying “the last remnants of idolatry in the city,” he was later declared a saint. [Dzielskaielska,  97-8, 104. 94]

Hypatia was not targeted only as a pagan. Other pagans—men—continued to be active at the university of Alexandria for decades after her death. It is clear that Hypatia’s femaleness made her a special target, vulnerable to the accusation of witchcraft. Her courage in opposing the escalating anti-Jewish violence and her moral stance against religious repression were factors as well. In defending the assault on the philosophical tradition of tolerance, Hypatia had everything to lose, yet she acted boldly.

Later in the century, her male counterparts also came under attack. By the mid-400s, pagan professors were being sentenced to death in Syria. Some time after 480, an Alexandrian Christian society called the Zealots hounded the pagan prefect and his secretary from office and into exile. The Zealots capped their triumph with the burning of “idols.” Two of them moved on to Beirut, where they incited further hunts of leading pagans. They formed a group to collect denunciations, using informers, and brought  names and accusations to the bishop. This worthy held joint hearings with city officials, which led to more bonfires and the exile of pagans. [MacMullen, 26, 194 fn95]

The cultural repression used to Christianize the Roman empire was unprecedented anywhere up to that time, in extent, duration and geographic scale.

The Blind Leading the Blind is Mind

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By Harry Krueger

The pristine consciousness acts as nature’s universal voice.

Tradition and culture – are they a good thing?

The origin of the word tradition is from the French: ‘tradicion’, a belief or custom that has been passed on. From Latin, the word is ‘tradere’ which means the same as the French, but it also has another meaning: to betray, from the word ‘traduce’. Whenever a response to a challenge comes from mind, the memory-senses complex, that response is incomplete and so, a betrayal of the present.

Intelligence is the mysterious expression of all that exists. This natural affinity also exists between consciousness and mind.

In ancient times there were groups of people who responded to life’s challenges from the pristine consciousness, Nature’s conduit between consciousness and Intelligence. These groups did not indulge in the accepted tradition of carrying over what had been repetitiously passed on, but rather responded with pristine clarity – that which is self-evident. They were carrying on the original intent of the relationship, the consciousness-Intelligence bonding. That relationship cannot be discerned by mind. Their fruits are of a different taste. Because they were mis-understood by many, they were called religious and spiritual cultists. They were by natural intent true traditionalists. They marched to the beat of a different drummer.

The origin of the word ‘culture’ is from the Middle English, denoting a cultivated piece of land. From the Latin it means ‘growing, cultivation’. From sixteenth century Middle English arose the terms: cultivation of mind, faculties and manners. As a result of this cultivation we became civilized societies. We entered into various groups with different ideals, beliefs and philosophies. The separation of consciousness from Intelligence (humanity’s original fall) led to our never ending culture wars.

The Function of Mind

The primary function of mind is to record and store what consciousness experiences and then relay (via the pristine senses) to consciousness whenever there is a request. Unfortunately, this function is scarcely operational. What we presently experience is a political operational system where life’s challenges are interceded by mind to empower its delusional fantasies.

From birth we are cultivated by society’s most prestigious and respected institutions. Their purpose is to advance (through indoctrination) the mind’s deceptions. Whatever culture we are raised in, we respond with similar thoughts and emotions. Our empirical imperial leader is mind. We are the clones and drones of all previous generations. We ask questions as if they are self-generated and not realizing that they are from answers given by family, friends and the various learning institutions.

We are told that we are original thinkers and have the ability to be creative. Many are born with gifts but creativity is scarce. What we may sincerely believe to be making individual choices is false. We are simply re-acting verbally and emotionally from our daily exploitations. We believe we are responding with the science of sound reasoning. As we presently function, that does not exist. Mind, as a recording, storing and relay system, cannot logically reason. It does not have conscious energy to support that assumption.

Mind sees and reasons only through the prism of its biased past.

Consciousness is not tangible. Mind as a tangible instrument of the physical organism can be pro-grammed, whereas consciousness cannot. What we have been told about mind, is a myth. The living organism cannot generate a single thought. It has no volition.

the mind leading the blindThoughts are contained in vessels where the senses lie. They act as a receptacle for its stored images. Those images, falsely acting as independent agents, are seducing the consciousness into believing that what it believes is self-generated. The seduction ends when consciousness can let go its imaginary fears and has the courage to see how it has been duped. In its pristine state consciousness is incapable of fear. Fear is only of the mind. Our conscious fears are really those of mind. At all cost, mind must continue to have consciousness believe the hypnotic lie that consciousness is mind. Without that belief there is an altering of the functioning process. Consciousness now becomes first responder to all of life’s challenges.

There are no winners, only losses to our present responding process. Mind’s loss is the deterioration of the memory cells by its relentless pursuit of emotionally charged non-existent situations. Consciousness’s loss is by the acquiescence of being complicit to mind’s abhorrent machinations and not being faithful to its pristine nature. As a result of its false responses, consciousness suffers a state of un-easiness. That un-easiness is not a judgement but rather a state of conscience. Consciousness is the conscience of the living organism. Conscience is an indication that we have veered off-track.

We experience conscience when there are emotions of hate, anger, envy, greed, anxiety, frustration, excitement of all kinds, hope and hopelessness, etc. To observe with pristine clarity all of our daily challenges and neither accept nor reject what is shown, that is, without judgement or justification, then instantaneously there is a realization that those emotions are of the mind.

In the field where fact-based daily utilitarian information is needed by consciousness, mind’s co-operation is indispensable. By original design it never was meant to supplant consciousness’s role. Consciousness’s role is to lead in all of the decision making processes. This is possible only through the pristine observation process. This becomes self-evident by simply having the courage to look. So be courageous. The first step is also the last step.

That courage is my wish for you.

Previous articles by Harry:

About the author:

California-based Harry Krueger has spent the past 40 years working to awaken humanity to concepts of peace freedom and consciousness. When he was 35 years old, he discovered a book by Sri Krishnamurti (which he read 7 times in a row) and it changed his outlook and consciousness forever. Harry is now 85, and has never looked back.

Through his writing, Harry reveals the glorious reality of who we human Beings truly are, and offers insights to help us to break through the false identification of who we are not.

“Life is real (and only then) when living the attentive life”

 Wake Up World.