Psychedelics and Religious Experience

by Alan Watts

  1. The Psychedelic Experience
    1. slowing down of time
    2. awareness of polarity
    3. awareness of relativity
    4. awareness of eternal energy
  2. Opposition to Psychedelic Drugs
    1. danger
    2. escape from reality
  3. Footnotes

(Originally appeared in the California Law Review, Vol. 56, No. 1, January 1968, pp. 74-85.) Copyright Alan Watts & California Law Review.

The experiences resulting from the use of psychedelic drugs are often described in religious terms. They are therefore of interest to those like myself who, in the tradition of William James,1 are concerned with the psychology of religion. For more than thirty years I have been studying the causes, the consequences, and the conditions of those peculiar states of consciousness in which the individual discovers himself to be one continuous process with God, with the Universe, with the Ground of Being, or whatever name he may use by cultural conditioning or personal preference for the ultimate and eternal reality. We have no satisfactory and definitive name for experiences of this kind. The terms “religious experience,” “mystical experience,” and “cosmic consciousness” are all too vague and comprehensive to denote that specific mode of consciousness which, to those who have known it, is as real and overwhelming as falling in love. This article describes such states of consciousness induced by psychedelic drugs, although they are virtually indistinguishable from genuine mystical experience. The article then discusses objections to the use of psychedelic drugs that arise mainly from the opposition between mystical values and the traditional religious and secular values of Western society.

The Psychedelic Experience

The idea of mystical experiences resulting from drug use is not readily accepted in Western societies. Western culture has, historically, a particular fascination with the value and virtue of man as an individual, self-determining, responsible ego, controlling himself and his world by the power of conscious effort and will. Nothing, then, could be more repugnant to this cultural tradition than the notion of spiritual or psychological growth through the use of drugs. A “drugged” person is by definition dimmed in consciousness, fogged in judgment, and deprived of will. But not all psychotropic (consciousness-changing) chemicals are narcotic and soporific, as are alcohol, opiates, and barbiturates. The effects of what are now called psychedelic (mind-manifesting) chemicals differ from those of alcohol as laughter differs from rage, or delight from depression. There is really no analogy between being “high” on LSD and “drunk” on bourbon. True, no one in either state should drive a car, but neither should one drive while reading a book, playing a violin, or making love. Certain creative activities and states of mind demand a concentration and devotion that are simply incompatible with piloting a death-dealing engine along a highway.

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5 thoughts on “Psychedelics and Religious Experience

  1. I think psychodelics are a very useful tool in helping us understand the quantum events that occur in the brain. Mankind seems to have charged down the wrong path in deciding that every human experience could be explained by Newtonian physics. Now that we understand that the difference between matter and energy is purely relative – and that matter separated by vast distances is interconnected – we have the “scientific” tools to understand what psychodelics showed us centuries ago.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I sure agree. There are those in power that have their livelihood riding on the status quo. I envision a change in the Newtonian paradigm coming, however slowly it might (or might not) be, it is happening. It just has to go mainstream and it will change everything.

      Like

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